A (Excellent) - The stock has an excellent track record for maximizing performance while minimizing risk, thus delivering the best possible combination of total return on investment and reduced volatility. It has made the most of the recent economic environment to maximize risk-adjusted returns compared to other stocks. While past performance is just an indication -- not a guarantee -- we believe this fund is among the most likely to deliver superior performance relative to risk in the future as well.

Plug Power is an excellent example of the volatility investors may experience when they buy stocks beneath $5 – in the early months of 2020, shares of Plug Power rocketed up over 80%, only to suffer 50% losses shortly thereafter. While speculators may have enjoyed the pop and drop, true investors would be wise to buy and hold Plug, which makes hydrogen fuel cells for commercial vehicles. Plug’s fuel cell shipments have increased dramatically over the last two years, and the company recently announced a partnership that will usher the world’s first fuel cell-powered, zero-emission commercial trucks onto the road. This opens Plug to new business opportunities as companies around the world turn toward clean energy solutions.
While most online brokers do not offer international trading, some do. Nearly every broker supports trading American depositary receipts (ADRs), which offers US investors an easy, simple way to invest in foreign companies. However, if you want to buy physical shares of an international company, then you need to do your research. Interactive Brokers is the leader in this space but is built for professionals. For casual investing, both Fidelity and Charles Schwab offer international stock trading.
Even when the stock price has performed as expected, there are questions: Should I take a profit now before the price falls? Should I keep my position since the price is likely to go higher? Thoughts like these will flood your mind, especially if you constantly watch the price of a security, eventually building to a point that you will take action. Since emotions are the primary driver of your action, it will probably be wrong.
Astute readers will realise that the above guidance is mainly taking different angles to help prepare for and guide decision making by the investor. The ability to confidently make decisions is vital for investment profits and long-term success. This pdf about the decision making models of Charlie Munger (business partner to Warren Buffett at Berkshire Hathaway - both are certified investment immortals) is almost certain to prove helpful.
Successful traders have to move fast, but they don't have to think fast. Why? Because they've developed a trading strategy in advance, along with the discipline to stick to that strategy. It is important to follow your formula closely rather than try to chase profits. Don't let your emotions get the best of you and abandon your strategy. There's a mantra among day traders: "Plan your trade and trade your plan."

Most of these services offer some form of free portfolio tracking - this enables you to create a portfolio and track it properly to see how you do with no money on the line. This used to be known as paper trading in the 'good old days' before 2001. This kind of exercise can be a good way to learn and play around with things without being either serious or costly.

ECN/Level 2 quotes: ECNs, or electronic communication networks, are computer-based systems that display the best available bid and ask quotes from multiple market participants and then automatically match and execute orders. Level 2 is a subscription-based service that provides real-time access to the Nasdaq order book composed of price quotes from market makers registering every Nasdaq-listed and OTC Bulletin Board security. Together, they can give you a sense of orders being executed in real time.
Experienced investors such as Buffett eschew stock diversification in the confidence that they have performed all of the necessary research to identify and quantify their risk. They are also comfortable that they can identify any potential perils that will endanger their position, and will be able to liquidate their investments before taking a catastrophic loss. Andrew Carnegie is reputed to have said, “The safest investment strategy is to put all of your eggs in one basket and watch the basket.” That said, do not make the mistake of thinking you are either Buffett or Carnegie – especially in your first years of investing.
Some countries also tax money that is sitting in exchanges under the form of cryptocurrency. The USA tax this as « investment money », i.e. at the price level that it cost you to invest. Example: 5% investment tax. You invested 350 EUR in cryptocurrency. Regardless of its value now (whether 1 EUR or 150000 EUR), you pay 5% on the invested 350 EUR. However when you cash out you will have to declare this as financial income.
When you buy some cryptocurrency, the money will be withdrawn from your bank account or card and you will be credited in your exchange in a sum matching the cryptocurrency you have purchased. Each exchange may allow you to trade for one or more cryptocurrencies. Each cryptocurrency on the exchange will have its own wallet. You can store your cryptocurrency on an exchange but it’s not a recommended practice. I will cover this in a section called Wallets.
Market Depth – the Market Depth view shows the total cumulated offer and demand for a given cryptocurrency. This is the place where we can identify the « sell walls » I was talking about in a previous section. A market that is not manipulated (or at least not overtly) will have a stair-shaped graph on both sizes, with people willing to buy or sell at different values.
A company's stock price has nothing to do with its value. A $50 stock can be more valuable than an $800 stock because the share price means nothing on its own. The relationship of price-to-earnings and net assets is what determines if a stock is overvalued or undervalued. Companies can keep prices artificially high by never conducting a stock split, yet not have the underlying foundational support. Make no assumptions based on price alone.
But this isn’t your typical market, and you can’t show up and pick your shares off a shelf the way you select produce at the grocery store. Individual traders are typically represented by brokers — these days, that’s often an online broker. You place your stock trades through the broker, which then deals with the exchange on your behalf. (Need a broker? See our analysis of the best stockbrokers for beginners.)

Before you raise your hand to complain, yes, we know that a computer can track price changes much better than most humans. We get it. But the aim of the exercise is to get a 'feel' for the movements in price and that is unlikely to happen by using a computer program and pressing a button. We are talking here about stocks for beginners, and beginners need the learning experience, not the quick fix automation. Just trust us...
Arbitraging can be very lucrative especially with Asian markets (South Korea for example) where cryptocurrencies are exchanged at premium rates, but due to the high volatility of the markets and the congestion on major cryptocurrencies (Bitcoin and Ethereum) it is becoming increasingly difficult to do arbitraging because of potential incurred losses. Add to this the fact that exchanges need a certain amount of confirmations before balances are made available for trading and it makes it quite risky at least for Bitcoin and Ethereum.

Warning 2: this is serious. If you don’t believe me, just go on Reddit (r/Cryptocurrency) and look for posts of people who ask for help. There are some devastating stories out there which are all based on greed, credulity, inexperience and/or outright stupidity. You may become rich, but you may also lose everything. People are taking loans with high repayment rates to buy at peak price and will end up ruined. Young inexperienced people have burned their relatives’ lifetime savings, others have no money to pay their university tuition. Don’t be those guys.
The recent market turbulence from the coronavirus pandemic has reinforced the importance of this approach. The stock market has recently gone through each of the three possible stages: market in confirmed uptrend, uptrend under pressure and market in correction. To stay protected throughout these changes, follow the No. 1 rule of investing: Always cut your losses short. While you can't control what the stock market does, this basic rule lets you control how you react.
The cryptocurrency market, while far from being in its infancy, is an extremely volatile market which is not subject to regulations, and thus can be subject to manipulations of all kind. There are many trends which impact operations on a daily basis: rumours can fuel the price of one cryptocurrency, some people or groups can apply « pump and dump » techniques etc. I will try to cover these, but please take good note of the following warning:
Once you are familiar with the concepts above, and know that you can (and eventually will) be influenced, you need to do some research on what projects you want to invest into. There are to date 1400+ cryptocurrency projects listed on coinmarketcap, a website that tracks projects, market value etc. This is a good start to understand market capitalisation, price of the cryptocurrency unit in what we understand when we begin (fiat currency i.e. dollars or anything else), total amount of assets in circulation etc.
Stock brokers are people or firms licensed to buy and sell stocks and other securities via the stock market exchanges. Back in the day, the only way for individuals to invest directly in stocks was to hire stock brokers to place trades on their behalf. But what was once a clunky, costly transaction conducted via landline telephones now takes place online in seconds, for a fraction of what full-service brokers used to charge for the service. Today, most investors place their trades through an online brokerage account. (A little lost? Check out our explainers on brokerage accounts and buying stocks.)

When thinking about the mindset of investors, The Great Crash 1929 by J.K.Galbraith (reviewed here) should also be required reading. Typically, any sustained fall in prices - known as a bear market - is very destructive to wealth. However, as Galbraith explains wonderfully, each bear market is unique and is a reflection of the bull market that came before it. The book explains a great deal about the feedback loops that can exist when prices rise and fall as more people are either sucked into or forced out of holdings. It is the reference work about a very important slice of Wall Street history.

If the strategy is within your risk limit, then testing begins. Manually go through historical charts to find your entries, noting whether your stop loss or target would have been hit. Paper trade in this way for at least 50 to 100 trades, noting whether the strategy was profitable and if it meets your expectations. If it does, proceed to trading the strategy in a demo account in real time. If it's profitable over the course of two months or more in a simulated environment, proceed with day trading the strategy with real capital. If the strategy isn't profitable, start over.


Once you are familiar with the concepts above, and know that you can (and eventually will) be influenced, you need to do some research on what projects you want to invest into. There are to date 1400+ cryptocurrency projects listed on coinmarketcap, a website that tracks projects, market value etc. This is a good start to understand market capitalisation, price of the cryptocurrency unit in what we understand when we begin (fiat currency i.e. dollars or anything else), total amount of assets in circulation etc.

Arbitraging can be very lucrative especially with Asian markets (South Korea for example) where cryptocurrencies are exchanged at premium rates, but due to the high volatility of the markets and the congestion on major cryptocurrencies (Bitcoin and Ethereum) it is becoming increasingly difficult to do arbitraging because of potential incurred losses. Add to this the fact that exchanges need a certain amount of confirmations before balances are made available for trading and it makes it quite risky at least for Bitcoin and Ethereum.
When thinking about the mindset of investors, The Great Crash 1929 by J.K.Galbraith (reviewed here) should also be required reading. Typically, any sustained fall in prices - known as a bear market - is very destructive to wealth. However, as Galbraith explains wonderfully, each bear market is unique and is a reflection of the bull market that came before it. The book explains a great deal about the feedback loops that can exist when prices rise and fall as more people are either sucked into or forced out of holdings. It is the reference work about a very important slice of Wall Street history.
If there are any lessons to be learned from the American sub-prime mortgage crisis, the 2008 stock market crash (information here) and Wall Street bailout that followed - and there are lots of lessons - it is that borrowed money can be very dangerous in investments, even when it is being handled professionally. The failure of LTCM, Bear Stearns, Lehman Brothers, Northern Rock and many others shows just how precarious a business model can be with too much gearing.
You may see a number of sales charges called loads when you buy mutual funds. Some are front-end loads, but you will also see no-load, and back-end load funds. Be sure you understand whether a fund you are considering carries a sales load prior to buying it. Check out your broker's list of no-load funds, and no-transaction-fee funds if you want to avoid these extra charges.

In the professional world, one of the key concepts is diversification. Harry Markowitz is a Nobel prize winning economist and one of his major discoveries was that adding new asset classes can dramatically alter the overall risk profile of a portfolio. His finding was that a portfolio that contained very low risk assets would normally benefit from lower volatility and higher returns if a higher risk asset was added. This is due to the likely lack of correlation between high and low risk asset classes.
B (Good) - The stock has a good track record for balancing performance with risk. Compared to other stocks, it has achieved above-average returns given the level of risk in its underlying investments. While the risk-adjusted performance of any stock is subject to change, we believe that this fund has proven to be a good investment in the recent past.
By understanding your risk tolerance, you can avoid those investments which are likely to make you anxious. Generally speaking, you should never own an asset which keeps you from sleeping in the night. Anxiety stimulates fear which triggers emotional responses (rather than logical responses) to the stressor. During periods of financial uncertainty, the investor who can retain a cool head and follows an analytical decision process invariably comes out ahead.
×