The stock market is made up of exchanges, like the New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq. Stocks are listed on a specific exchange, which brings buyers and sellers together and acts as a market for the shares of those stocks. The exchange tracks the supply and demand — and directly related, the price — of each stock. (Need to back up a bit? Read our explainer about stocks.)
While both terms - stock market and stock exchange - are used interchangeably, the latter term is generally a subset of the former. If one says that she trades in the stock market, it means that she buys and sells shares/equities on one (or more) of the stock exchange(s) that are part of the overall stock market. The leading stock exchanges in the U.S. include the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), Nasdaq, and the Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE). These leading national exchanges, along with several other exchanges operating in the country, form the stock market of the U.S.

It pays to shop around some before deciding on where you want to open an account, and to check out our broker reviews. We list minimum deposits at the top of each review. Some firms do not require minimum deposits. Others may often lower costs, like trading fees and account management fees, if you have a balance above a certain threshold. Still, others may give a certain number of commission-free trades for opening an account.
Sell walls: the action of artificially keeping the price of a cryptocurrency asset low by placing a large sell order. Large financial operators or investors (nicknamed « whales ») may want to artificially keep the price of a cryptocurrency low so that they can keep accumulating quietly, without causing a sharp rise in price. These are called « walls » because on exchanges, the graphics showing offer and demand will show a very high « wall » on the offer size. The mechanism is that the investor will put a very large sell order (usually 100 to 1000 times more cryptocurrency units than regular orders). Because of how exchanges operate, the sell will only take place if there is sufficient demand to fulfil the entire order, so smaller operators who have a real need/urge to sell would have to sell below that wall (i.e. cheaper) to make sure they can get paid. This will cause a condition where the price will stagnate, allowing those whales to put as much smaller buy orders as they need. Sell walls may be removed once the buying whales have reached their objectives.
Experienced investors such as Buffett eschew stock diversification in the confidence that they have performed all of the necessary research to identify and quantify their risk. They are also comfortable that they can identify any potential perils that will endanger their position, and will be able to liquidate their investments before taking a catastrophic loss. Andrew Carnegie is reputed to have said, “The safest investment strategy is to put all of your eggs in one basket and watch the basket.” That said, do not make the mistake of thinking you are either Buffett or Carnegie – especially in your first years of investing.
Buy “the basket”: Can’t decide which of the companies in a particular industry will be the long-term winner? Buy ’em all! Buying a basket of stocks takes the pressure off picking “the one.” Having a stake in all the players that pass muster in your analysis means you won’t miss out if one takes off, and you can use gains from that winner to offset any losses. This strategy will also help you identify which company is “the one” so you can double down on your position if desired.
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