Those exchanges allow the purchase of cryptocurrency either via a card payment, or via a wire transfer / SEPA deposit from your bank account. They will also require some sort of identification because they are bound by financial laws related to customer due diligence and AML (anti money laundering) legislation. You may be asked to provide identification information such as an ID card, a passport or a proof of address. Note that some sites have different thresholds to buy cryptocurrency or withdraw fiat currency to your bank account based on the level of identification info you have provided. If you are into this seriously, make sure to provide the info necessary to the level you want to reach in time, not at the last minute when you want to liquidate your positions (or said differently, when you want to cash out).

Rarely is short-term noise (blaring headlines, temporary price fluctuations) relevant to how a well-chosen company performs over the long term. It’s how investors react to the noise that really matters. Here’s where that rational voice from calmer times — your investing journal — can serve as a guide to sticking it out during the inevitable ups and downs that come with investing in stocks.

A (Excellent) - The stock has an excellent track record for maximizing performance while minimizing risk, thus delivering the best possible combination of total return on investment and reduced volatility. It has made the most of the recent economic environment to maximize risk-adjusted returns compared to other stocks. While past performance is just an indication -- not a guarantee -- we believe this fund is among the most likely to deliver superior performance relative to risk in the future as well.
B (Good) - The stock has a good track record for balancing performance with risk. Compared to other stocks, it has achieved above-average returns given the level of risk in its underlying investments. While the risk-adjusted performance of any stock is subject to change, we believe that this fund has proven to be a good investment in the recent past.
Warning: Only invest in cryptocurrency what you can afford to lose! Be prepared to lose everything. Expect high fluctuations. Do not put in there money that is vital for you whether it is paying for rent, utilities, loans, mortgages or necessary goods (food & medicines). See this as spending money on collaterals or nice to have: restaurant, books, travelling, cinema etc.
Arbitraging can be very lucrative especially with Asian markets (South Korea for example) where cryptocurrencies are exchanged at premium rates, but due to the high volatility of the markets and the congestion on major cryptocurrencies (Bitcoin and Ethereum) it is becoming increasingly difficult to do arbitraging because of potential incurred losses. Add to this the fact that exchanges need a certain amount of confirmations before balances are made available for trading and it makes it quite risky at least for Bitcoin and Ethereum.
Pump and dump: this characterises a movement where a group of people with influence will either spread rumours, share hypothetical information or shill (shameless promotion) about a given cryptocurrency project. Their followers will start to buy massively the related cryptocurrency, initiating a « pump » movement, i.e. price starts going up very high and fast. At the same time, the people who spread those rumours will leverage the high increase to do a « dump » movement, i.e. sell the same cryptocurrency (that they had bought at very low prices) at the newly reached high price. The result: the group that initiated the pump will make a large profit, while the people who jumped on the pump train (those who bought in because of FOMO, fear of missing out) will have bought at a high price and are now with an asset that is worth only a fraction of the purchase price
Thirty-two percent of Americans who were invested in the stock market during at least one of the last five financial downturns pulled some or all of their money out of the market. That’s according to a NerdWallet-commissioned survey, which was conducted online by The Harris Poll of more than 2,000 U.S. adults, among whom over 700 were invested in the stock market during at least one of the past five financial downturns, in June 2018. The survey also found that 28% of Americans would not keep their money in the stock market if there were a crash today.

The idea of perception is important, especially in investing. As you gain more knowledge about investments – for example, how stocks are bought and sold, how much volatility (price change) is usually present, and the difficulty or ease of liquidating an investment – you are likely to consider stock investments to have less risk than you thought before making your first purchase. As a consequence, your anxiety when investing is less intense, even though your risk tolerance remains unchanged because your perception of the risk has evolved.
Work-based retirement plans deduct your contributions from your paycheck before taxes are calculated, which will make the contribution even less painful. Once you're comfortable with a one percent contribution, maybe you can increase it as you get annual raises. You won't likely miss the additional contributions. If you have a 401(k) retirement account at work, you may already be investing in your future with allocations to mutual funds and even your own company's stock.
I am not endorsing any service or product mentioned above, nor am I providing any affiliate links. Any mentioned company, service or product is mentioned exclusively for illustrative purposes and readers are encouraged to do their own research. Also, this website is administered by myself and hosting costs are exclusively funded out of my own pocket.

Though it is called a stock market or equity market and is primarily known for trading stocks/equities, other financial securities - like exchange traded funds (ETF), corporate bonds and derivatives based on stocks, commodities, currencies, and bonds - are also traded in the stock markets. (For related reading, see "What's the Difference Between the Equity Market and the Stock Market?")


Investing in stocks can be done in many ways. If you would like to form a strategy and manage your own investments, you can open a brokerage account. If you're unsure about where to start, consider opening an account with a robo advisor who will do the work at a lower cost. For those who want more guidance about their retirement plans, turning to financial advisors might be a good solution.
Buy “the basket”: Can’t decide which of the companies in a particular industry will be the long-term winner? Buy ’em all! Buying a basket of stocks takes the pressure off picking “the one.” Having a stake in all the players that pass muster in your analysis means you won’t miss out if one takes off, and you can use gains from that winner to offset any losses. This strategy will also help you identify which company is “the one” so you can double down on your position if desired.
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