Stockbrokers, also known as registered representatives in the U.S., are the licensed professionals who buy and sell securities on behalf of investors. The brokers act as intermediaries between the stock exchanges and the investors by buying and selling stocks on the investors' behalf. An account with a retail broker is needed to gain access to the markets.

This education really ought to include one of the daily papers that covers the movements on the stock exchange (information here) in detail, such as the Financial Times or Wall Street Journal. Remember, the investment bankers that you are competing against have Bloomberg terminals and Reuters subscriptions, while everyone else is watching CNN and MSNBC. Since everyone is reading the same things on the same days, these might not be the best places to pick up your share market tips...
Bonus Stock Market Tip: Everything above is related to how best to invest actively - in other words buying and selling into companies that have been selected by you. But what if you don't have the time, money or inclination? What if the paragraphs above put you off? Perhaps you were looking for a simpler guide? The stock market for dummies perhaps?
To buy cryptocurrency using what is called « fiat currency » (i.e. Euros, Dollars, Yen, whatever is your local currency), you will need to sign up to an exchange. There are two kinds of exchanges: fiat to cryptocurrency exchanges and cryptocurrency only exchanges. Obviously to get started you will need to go into an exchange that allows the purchase (and selling) of cryptocurrency against fiat currency, such as Coinbase, Kraken, GDAX etc. (note that some instant access exchanges – see below- also allow instant purchase with cash).
Plug Power is an excellent example of the volatility investors may experience when they buy stocks beneath $5 – in the early months of 2020, shares of Plug Power rocketed up over 80%, only to suffer 50% losses shortly thereafter. While speculators may have enjoyed the pop and drop, true investors would be wise to buy and hold Plug, which makes hydrogen fuel cells for commercial vehicles. Plug’s fuel cell shipments have increased dramatically over the last two years, and the company recently announced a partnership that will usher the world’s first fuel cell-powered, zero-emission commercial trucks onto the road. This opens Plug to new business opportunities as companies around the world turn toward clean energy solutions.
Rarely is short-term noise (blaring headlines, temporary price fluctuations) relevant to how a well-chosen company performs over the long term. It’s how investors react to the noise that really matters. Here’s where that rational voice from calmer times — your investing journal — can serve as a guide to sticking it out during the inevitable ups and downs that come with investing in stocks.
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