Rarely is short-term noise (blaring headlines, temporary price fluctuations) relevant to how a well-chosen company performs over the long term. It’s how investors react to the noise that really matters. Here’s where that rational voice from calmer times — your investing journal — can serve as a guide to sticking it out during the inevitable ups and downs that come with investing in stocks.
Notice: Information contained herein is not and should not be construed as an offer, solicitation, or recommendation to buy or sell securities. The information has been obtained from sources we believe to be reliable; however no guarantee is made or implied with respect to its accuracy, timeliness, or completeness. Authors may own the stocks they discuss. The information and content are subject to change without notice.

About the author: Blain Reinkensmeyer As Head of Research at StockBrokers.com, Blain Reinkensmeyer has 18 years of trading experience with over 1,000 trades placed during that time. Referenced as a leading expert on the US online brokerage industry, Blain has been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Forbes, and the Chicago Tribune, among others.
The stock market refers to the collection of markets and exchanges where regular activities of buying, selling, and issuance of shares of publicly-held companies take place. Such financial activities are conducted through institutionalized formal exchanges or over-the-counter (OTC) marketplaces which operate under a defined set of regulations. There can be multiple stock trading venues in a country or a region which allow transactions in stocks and other forms of securities.
Blue-chip stocks—which get their name from poker, where the most valuable playing chip color is blue—are well-known, well-established companies that have a history of paying out consistent dividends, regardless of the economic conditions. Investors like them because they tend to grow dividend rates faster than the rate of inflation, so the owner increases income without having to buy another share. Blue-chip stocks are not flashy, but they have solid balance sheets and steady returns.
Balances and confirmations – this is where you fund your exchange accounts, and also where the money you trade will be deposited. Bear in mind that when you send cryptocurrency to an exchange, or you withdraw cryptocurrency to your personal wallet, there will be a delay that varies per exchange. Each exchange will wait for a certain number of confirmations before effectively releasing your funds, this happens on the blockchain.
Choosing the right stock can be a fool's errand, but investing in high-quality stocks such as blue chips and dividend-yielding ones are often good strategies. One reason investors opt for blue chips is because of the potential for growth and stability and because they produce dividends - these include companies such as Microsoft (ticker: MSFT), Coca-Cola Co. (KO) and Procter & Gamble Co. (PG). Coco-Cola, for example, generates a dividend of 2.9%, and the stock is less volatile as its share price has hovered between $44 and $55 during the past 52 weeks. Dividends can generate much-needed income for investors, especially higher-dividend ones.

And you can find such stocks in lists like the IBD 50, Sector Leaders, IBD Big Cap 20, IBD Long-Term Leaders, and IPO Leaders. For example, fast-growing semiconductor designer and artificial intelligence (AI) stock Nvidia was featured on the IBD 50 before it surged 750%. And Apple has been featured on various IBD lists as it has made big moves in recent years. While, of course, not every stock featured on an IBD list will make the type of moves that Nvidia and Apple have made, it does show why it pays to regularly update your list of stocks to watch using these S&P 500-beating screens.


When thinking about the mindset of investors, The Great Crash 1929 by J.K.Galbraith (reviewed here) should also be required reading. Typically, any sustained fall in prices - known as a bear market - is very destructive to wealth. However, as Galbraith explains wonderfully, each bear market is unique and is a reflection of the bull market that came before it. The book explains a great deal about the feedback loops that can exist when prices rise and fall as more people are either sucked into or forced out of holdings. It is the reference work about a very important slice of Wall Street history.

The stock exchange shoulders the responsibility of ensuring price transparency, liquidity, price discovery and fair dealings in such trading activities. As almost all major stock markets across the globe now operate electronically, the exchange maintains trading systems that efficiently manage the buy and sell orders from various market participants. They perform the price matching function to facilitate trade execution at a price fair to both buyers and sellers.

Dividends are quarterly payments companies send out to their shareholders. Dividend investing refers to portfolios containing stocks that consistently issue dividend payments throughout the years. These stocks produce a reliable passive income stream that can be beneficial in retirement. You can't judge a stock by its dividend price alone, however. Sometimes companies will increase dividends as a way to attract investors when the underlying company is in trouble. If a company is offering high dividends, ask yourself why management isn't reinvesting some of that money in the company for growth.
You can profit from owning stocks by an increase in prices or quarterly dividend payments. Due to compound interest—which allows your interest to begin earning interest—investments accumulate over time and can yield a solid return. For example, if you make an initial $1,000 investment and add $100 monthly for 20 years, you'd end up with $74,457.50, even though you only contributed $25,000.
You should be aware of the risks involved in stock investing and you use the content contained herein at your own risk. Neither Trade Achievers nor any of its suppliers guarantee its accuracy or validity, nor are they responsible for any errors or omissions which may have occurred. The analysis, ratings and/or recommendations made by Trade Achievers and/or any of its suppliers do not provide, imply, or otherwise constitute a guarantee of performance.
Based on a unique study of every market cycle since the 1880s, Investor's Business Daily's CAN SLIM Investing System gives you the tools to do just that. It identifies the seven common traits of winning stocks, and provides time-tested rules for how to buy stocks like Veeva Systems (VEEV), Nvidia (NVDA), Facebook (FB), Amazon.com (AMZN) or Apple (AAPL) as they begin to climb higher, when to sell to lock in your profits, and how to time the stock market.
Warning 2: this is serious. If you don’t believe me, just go on Reddit (r/Cryptocurrency) and look for posts of people who ask for help. There are some devastating stories out there which are all based on greed, credulity, inexperience and/or outright stupidity. You may become rich, but you may also lose everything. People are taking loans with high repayment rates to buy at peak price and will end up ruined. Young inexperienced people have burned their relatives’ lifetime savings, others have no money to pay their university tuition. Don’t be those guys.
Finding the best stocks to buy and watch starts with knowing what a big market winner looks like before it takes off. As noted above, IBD's study of the top-performing stocks in each market cycle since the 1880s has identified the seven telltale traits of market winners. Your goal is to find stocks that are displaying those same traits right now. Traits like explosive earnings and sales growth, a strong return on equity, a fast-growing and industry-leading product or service and strong demand among mutual fund managers.

At the same time, there are literally hundreds of thousands of individuals who buy and sell corporate securities on one of the regulated stock exchanges or the NASDAQ regularly and are successful. A profitable outcome is not the result of luck, but the application of a few simple principles derived from the experiences of millions of investors over countless stock market cycles.

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