Instant-access exchanges offer speed and anonymity. You will most often trade your cryptocurrency against another at a fixed rate, but without the hassle of having to set up an account on a full exchange, without having to fund balances (you must use your own wallets – more on wallets below), place buy/sell orders, then withdraw to your wallet. You will have to provide two addresses (in cryptocurrencies, addresses are where your funds reside to make it short): a payment address (for the cryptocurrency you want to purchase, i.e. the address of your target wallet) and a refund address (the address from where you are sending the money from, in case the exchange order cannot be fulfilled. These exchanges are for example Evercoin, Nexchange, ShapeShift or Changelly (Changelly is not anonymous though). Some of those will even allow to purchase cryptocurrency with fiat currency.
Buy in thirds: Like dollar-cost averaging, “buying in thirds” helps you avoid the morale-crushing experience of bumpy results right out of the gate. Divide the amount you want to invest by three and then, as the name implies, pick three separate points to buy shares. These can be at regular intervals (e.g., monthly or quarterly) or based on performance or company events. For example, you might buy shares before a product is released and put the next third of your money into play if it’s a hit — or divert the remaining money elsewhere if it’s not.
Now, imagine that you decide to buy the stocks of those five companies with your $1,000. To do this, you will incur $50 in trading costs—assuming the fee is $10—which is equivalent to 5% of your $1,000. If you were to fully invest the $1,000, your account would be reduced to $950 after trading costs. This represents a 5% loss before your investments even have a chance to earn.
Instant-access exchanges offer speed and anonymity. You will most often trade your cryptocurrency against another at a fixed rate, but without the hassle of having to set up an account on a full exchange, without having to fund balances (you must use your own wallets – more on wallets below), place buy/sell orders, then withdraw to your wallet. You will have to provide two addresses (in cryptocurrencies, addresses are where your funds reside to make it short): a payment address (for the cryptocurrency you want to purchase, i.e. the address of your target wallet) and a refund address (the address from where you are sending the money from, in case the exchange order cannot be fulfilled. These exchanges are for example Evercoin, Nexchange, ShapeShift or Changelly (Changelly is not anonymous though). Some of those will even allow to purchase cryptocurrency with fiat currency.
As written in section Investing 3, you should never keep any valuable assets on an exchange, unless you engage in day trading. You should get an appropriate wallet to store your cryptocurrency safely. To explain the concept better, what you are storing is not the cryptocurrency itself, but your private keys, the keys that allow you to spend the cryptocurrency that is assigned to you and stored on the blockchain of the given cryptocurrency (of course each project has its own blockchain, just like each bank has its own internal banking system – to simplify heavily). Anyone who has access to your private key is in control of your cryptocurrency assets, so you must secure them. Most if not all of the wallets around have a feature called a backup phrase. It is a mnemonic sequence of words that must be written on paper and stored securely. If you lose access to your wallet, get it lost or stolen or whatever, this backup phrase should allow you to recover instantly access to your private keys and funds, after which you should immediately transfer them to a new address.
Fortunately, at least in the United States, investors do not have too much to worry about when it comes to account security. This is especially true when choosing a brokerage that is large, well known, and properly regulated. Every website should be secured with SSL encryption, and client data should be stored in secure servers. Dual-factor authentication and Face ID are other security protocols quickly growing in popularity.
Should the company management and majority owners choose, they can pay one or more dividends per year to stockholders. The money for these dividends will typically come from profits earned within the business. In most countries, these dividends are subject to income tax payable by the receiver. Often there is a withholding tax taken at source to ensure that non-resident shareholders pay as well. 
Preferred stocks are very different from shares of common stock most investors own. Holders of preferred stock are always the first to receive dividends, and in cases of bankruptcy, will be first to get paid. However, the stock price does not fluctuate the way common stock does, so some gains can be missed on companies with hypergrowth. Preferred shareholders also get no voting rights in company elections. They're a hybrid of common stock and bonds.
The performance data contained herein represents past performance which does not guarantee future results. Investment return and principal value will fluctuate so that shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance quoted. For performance information current to the most recent month end, please contact us.
Bernard Baruch, known as “The Lone Wolf of Wall Street,” owned his own seat on the New York Stock Exchange by age 30 and became of the country’s best known financiers by 1910. Mr. Baruch, while a master of his profession, had no illusions about the difficulties of successful stock market investing, saying, “The main purpose of the stock market is to make fools of as many men as possible.” According to Ken Little, author of 15 books on investing and personal finance topics, “If you are an individual investor in the stock market, you should know that the system stacks the deck in its favor.”
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