The Intelligent Investor by Ben Graham ought to be required reading for every private investor. While the innovations he brought to stock analysis have long been outdated and the red flags he used to watch out for in a company's accounts are now regulated against by the SEC, many of his insights about thinking about investment still stand. For example, his description of Mr Market is still an excellent way of understanding how a crowd moves with the daily news.
Balances and confirmations – this is where you fund your exchange accounts, and also where the money you trade will be deposited. Bear in mind that when you send cryptocurrency to an exchange, or you withdraw cryptocurrency to your personal wallet, there will be a delay that varies per exchange. Each exchange will wait for a certain number of confirmations before effectively releasing your funds, this happens on the blockchain.
The exchange also earns from selling market data generated on its platform - like real-time data, historical data, summary data, and reference data – which is vital for equity research and other uses. Many exchanges will also sell technology products, like a trading terminal and dedicated network connection to the exchange, to the interested parties for a suitable fee.
This is an excellent learning experience and one that is vital to the long-term profitability of anyone in the stock market. To get the real experience, purchase some graph paper and chart the stock price movements each day by hand. Learn to compare this with the overall movements of the equity market or index and a whole new world of investment and money will begin to open up to you!
When thinking about a stock exchange it is worth remembering that it is a capital market. The primary purpose of a capital market is to enable businesses to raise money to provide working capital to fund expansion and growth. In exchange for this money, the companies issue equity in the form of stock, creating stockholders. Each stockholder ownes a piece of the active business relative to the amount of money they invested.

It is also worth trying to keep up to date with the latest thinking related to the area of investment that you are trying to specialise in. Therefore, if you plan to invest in defensive or income stocks, for example, it would be wise to read regularly about value investing and dividends. If you plan to invest in growth stocks, it would be wise to read about technology and the latest trends. Perhaps you could subscribe to one or more trade publications that relate to the sector(s) that you are most interested in.

The challenge with Bitcoin and Ethereum these days is two-fold: first of all, both networks are congested with very high utilisation. How does that impacts us? Congestion means that there are more transactions to be processed than the system can actually ingest, which leads into transaction queuing. This means that those transactions will go in a wait list to be mined, and that means that it can take at least 20 minutes to a few hours for your transaction to be confirmed – a confirmation meaning that the transaction has been validated in at least one block. Going with BTC or LTC may result in longer times to get your money effectively transferred from one place to the other (for example if you want to store it securely on your wallet, or if you need to send it to an exchange). For transaction speed I prefer to go with Litecoin at the moment, except in cases where Bitcoin is still more advantageous. Keep in mind that despite the huge transaction fees Bitcoin sees massive adoption and has the first comer advantage.
Fear of missing out: the psychological concept of buying something because of the fear that we may miss out on hypothetical future earnings, or that the occasion is too good and might not present itself again. Abbreviated FOMO, this is typical of very huge sales/discounts, such as Black Friday, where people buy a lot of useless stuff because they fear they may miss out on a huge bargain. FOMO is very much linked with « pump and dump » movements.

3. Get an education. Warren Buffett has suggested in the past that every investor should be able to understand basic accountancy principles, an annual report and stock market history. You probably do not need to become an accountant, but being able to understand the scoring system of the game can only help. There are thousands of books about investing and trading - you don't need to read them all, but you probably ought to read a few to enhance your theoretical knowledge.
Choosing the right stock can be a fool's errand, but investing in high-quality stocks such as blue chips and dividend-yielding ones are often good strategies. One reason investors opt for blue chips is because of the potential for growth and stability and because they produce dividends - these include companies such as Microsoft (ticker: MSFT), Coca-Cola Co. (KO) and Procter & Gamble Co. (PG). Coco-Cola, for example, generates a dividend of 2.9%, and the stock is less volatile as its share price has hovered between $44 and $55 during the past 52 weeks. Dividends can generate much-needed income for investors, especially higher-dividend ones.
In addition to knowledge of basic trading procedures, day traders need to keep up on the latest stock market news and events that affect stocks—the Fed's interest rate plans, the economic outlook, etc. So do your homework. Make a wish list of stocks you'd like to trade and keep yourself informed about the selected companies and general markets. Scan business news and visit reliable financial websites. 

E (Very Weak) - The stock has significantly underperformed most other funds given the level of risk in its underlying investments, resulting in a very weak risk-adjusted performance. Thus, its investment strategy and/or management has done just the opposite of what was needed to maximize returns in the recent economic environment. While the risk-adjusted performance of any stock is subject to change, we believe this fund has proven to be a very bad investment in the recent past.
Risk tolerance is a psychological trait that is genetically based, but positively influenced by education, income, and wealth (as these increase, risk tolerance appears to increase slightly) and negatively by age (as one gets older, risk tolerance decreases). Your risk tolerance is how you feel about risk and the degree of anxiety you feel when risk is present. In psychological terms, risk tolerance is defined as “the extent to which a person chooses to risk experiencing a less favorable outcome in the pursuit of a more favorable outcome.” In other words, would you risk $100 to win $1,000? Or $1,000 to win $1,000? All humans vary in their risk tolerance, and there is no “right” balance.
It’s all fun and games until the taxman passes. There is no clear legislation on taxes and it varies on per case and per country basis. My personal recommendation is to declare the money you cash out on your tax form. This would normally be taxed as « financial income money », just like if you sold shares or cashed out money from the income of your own company (like when you get paid dividends). Example: 15% financial income tax. You cash out 10000 EUR, you get taxed 15% on this.
Buy “the basket”: Can’t decide which of the companies in a particular industry will be the long-term winner? Buy ’em all! Buying a basket of stocks takes the pressure off picking “the one.” Having a stake in all the players that pass muster in your analysis means you won’t miss out if one takes off, and you can use gains from that winner to offset any losses. This strategy will also help you identify which company is “the one” so you can double down on your position if desired.
×