Imagine owning stocks in five different companies, each of which you expect to continually grow profits. Unfortunately, circumstances change. At the end of the year, you might have two companies (A & B) that have performed well so their stocks are up 25% each. The stock of two other companies (C & D) in a different industry are up 10% each, while the fifth company’s (E) assets were liquidated to pay off a massive lawsuit.
You can profit from owning stocks by an increase in prices or quarterly dividend payments. Due to compound interest—which allows your interest to begin earning interest—investments accumulate over time and can yield a solid return. For example, if you make an initial $1,000 investment and add $100 monthly for 20 years, you'd end up with $74,457.50, even though you only contributed $25,000.
Thirty-two percent of Americans who were invested in the stock market during at least one of the last five financial downturns pulled some or all of their money out of the market. That’s according to a NerdWallet-commissioned survey, which was conducted online by The Harris Poll of more than 2,000 U.S. adults, among whom over 700 were invested in the stock market during at least one of the past five financial downturns, in June 2018. The survey also found that 28% of Americans would not keep their money in the stock market if there were a crash today.
Investing is a way to set aside money while you are busy with life and have that money work for you so that you can fully reap the rewards of your labor in the future. Investing is a means to a happier ending. Legendary investor Warren Buffett defines investing as "… the process of laying out money now to receive more money in the future." The goal of investing is to put your money to work in one or more types of investment vehicles in the hopes of growing your money over time.
We used a five-star-based rating system to rate companies in the discount stock brokers list above. The best brokerage firms would get the highest, five-star rating. In 2020 not a single firm got five stars, however six brokers were rated at four and half stars. Any brokerage house with two- or one-star rating should be avoided. Three-star rated firm is perfectly fine, but there are, probably, better options for investors to consider. All companies with three and half stars and higher are recommended for at least one category of investors.

Once you are familiar with the concepts above, and know that you can (and eventually will) be influenced, you need to do some research on what projects you want to invest into. There are to date 1400+ cryptocurrency projects listed on coinmarketcap, a website that tracks projects, market value etc. This is a good start to understand market capitalisation, price of the cryptocurrency unit in what we understand when we begin (fiat currency i.e. dollars or anything else), total amount of assets in circulation etc.
Plug Power is an excellent example of the volatility investors may experience when they buy stocks beneath $5 – in the early months of 2020, shares of Plug Power rocketed up over 80%, only to suffer 50% losses shortly thereafter. While speculators may have enjoyed the pop and drop, true investors would be wise to buy and hold Plug, which makes hydrogen fuel cells for commercial vehicles. Plug’s fuel cell shipments have increased dramatically over the last two years, and the company recently announced a partnership that will usher the world’s first fuel cell-powered, zero-emission commercial trucks onto the road. This opens Plug to new business opportunities as companies around the world turn toward clean energy solutions.
A stock's market capitalization (cap) is the sum of the total shares outstanding multiplied by price. For example, if a company has 1 million outstanding shares priced at $50, its market cap would be $50 million. It has more meaning than the share price because it allows you to evaluate a company in the context of similar-sized companies in its industry. A small-cap company with a capitalization of $500 million shouldn't be compared to a large-cap company worth more than $10 billion. Here are how companies are generally grouped:
Sell walls: the action of artificially keeping the price of a cryptocurrency asset low by placing a large sell order. Large financial operators or investors (nicknamed « whales ») may want to artificially keep the price of a cryptocurrency low so that they can keep accumulating quietly, without causing a sharp rise in price. These are called « walls » because on exchanges, the graphics showing offer and demand will show a very high « wall » on the offer size. The mechanism is that the investor will put a very large sell order (usually 100 to 1000 times more cryptocurrency units than regular orders). Because of how exchanges operate, the sell will only take place if there is sufficient demand to fulfil the entire order, so smaller operators who have a real need/urge to sell would have to sell below that wall (i.e. cheaper) to make sure they can get paid. This will cause a condition where the price will stagnate, allowing those whales to put as much smaller buy orders as they need. Sell walls may be removed once the buying whales have reached their objectives.
Warning: Only invest in cryptocurrency what you can afford to lose! Be prepared to lose everything. Expect high fluctuations. Do not put in there money that is vital for you whether it is paying for rent, utilities, loans, mortgages or necessary goods (food & medicines). See this as spending money on collaterals or nice to have: restaurant, books, travelling, cinema etc.
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