Instant-access exchanges offer speed and anonymity. You will most often trade your cryptocurrency against another at a fixed rate, but without the hassle of having to set up an account on a full exchange, without having to fund balances (you must use your own wallets – more on wallets below), place buy/sell orders, then withdraw to your wallet. You will have to provide two addresses (in cryptocurrencies, addresses are where your funds reside to make it short): a payment address (for the cryptocurrency you want to purchase, i.e. the address of your target wallet) and a refund address (the address from where you are sending the money from, in case the exchange order cannot be fulfilled. These exchanges are for example Evercoin, Nexchange, ShapeShift or Changelly (Changelly is not anonymous though). Some of those will even allow to purchase cryptocurrency with fiat currency.
Alternatively, you may be looking at digging hidden gems that may be well below the top 50 or top 100 projects, but still have a very solid technology or are undervalued. Doing your own research may help here, but of course it will require more investment and time spent, with a possibly longer ROI (Return on Investment) but the hope of higher gains.

Balances and confirmations – this is where you fund your exchange accounts, and also where the money you trade will be deposited. Bear in mind that when you send cryptocurrency to an exchange, or you withdraw cryptocurrency to your personal wallet, there will be a delay that varies per exchange. Each exchange will wait for a certain number of confirmations before effectively releasing your funds, this happens on the blockchain.
Phrases like “earnings movers” and “intraday highs” don’t mean much to the average investor, and in many cases, they shouldn’t. If you’re in it for the long term — with, say, a portfolio of mutual funds geared toward retirement — you don’t need to worry about what these words mean, or about the flashes of red or green that cross the bottom of your TV screen. You can get by just fine without understanding the stock market much at all.
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The first three points are easy to a certain extent. The point about what to invest into will be covered later on in this guide and will dictate your placement strategy. The final point, about technical expertise, will also dictate what you can and cannot do. Every cryptocurrency has its own specifics, its own wallet (a wallet is where you store your cryptocurrency, more on that later), some are easier to use, some are complicated, not all the cryptocurrencies especially emerging ones have widespread platform support (some only have Windows-based or Linux-based clients, some have also MacOS integration, some support mobile clients etc.) I will cover this in the « Wallets » section.

Buy in thirds: Like dollar-cost averaging, “buying in thirds” helps you avoid the morale-crushing experience of bumpy results right out of the gate. Divide the amount you want to invest by three and then, as the name implies, pick three separate points to buy shares. These can be at regular intervals (e.g., monthly or quarterly) or based on performance or company events. For example, you might buy shares before a product is released and put the next third of your money into play if it’s a hit — or divert the remaining money elsewhere if it’s not.
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