Now, imagine that you decide to buy the stocks of those five companies with your $1,000. To do this, you will incur $50 in trading costs—assuming the fee is $10—which is equivalent to 5% of your $1,000. If you were to fully invest the $1,000, your account would be reduced to $950 after trading costs. This represents a 5% loss before your investments even have a chance to earn.
But this isn’t your typical market, and you can’t show up and pick your shares off a shelf the way you select produce at the grocery store. Individual traders are typically represented by brokers — these days, that’s often an online broker. You place your stock trades through the broker, which then deals with the exchange on your behalf. (Need a broker? See our analysis of the best stockbrokers for beginners.)
Stock exchanges operate as for-profit institutes and charge a fee for their services. The primary source of income for these stock exchanges are the revenues from the transaction fees that are charged for each trade carried out on its platform. Additionally, exchanges earn revenue from the listing fee charged to companies during the IPO process and other follow-on offerings.
While some people do buy winning tickets or a common stock that quadruples or more in a year, it is extremely unlikely, since relying upon luck is an investment strategy that only the foolish or most desperate would choose to follow. In our quest for success, we often overlook the most powerful tools available to us: time and the magic of compounding interest. Investing regularly, avoiding unnecessary financial risk, and letting your money work for you over a period of years and decades is a certain way to amass significant assets.
Buy & Sell Orders – each exchange has their own method of placing buy or sell orders but generally speaking the interface is similar as that of a trading application. This requires some familiarisation with the exchange interfaces. In essence, there are two sides on any exchange: people who want to sell, and people who want to buy. Everybody can sell or buy at the price they want, but obviously buyers want to buy at the cheapest price and sellers want to make the biggest profit, which means that eventually a middle point will be reached where the transactions take place. It’s common for people to cancel their sell or buy orders and put in place new ones by 0.00001 increments just to get the « top » place on the buy or sell list, i.e. sell at the « lowest price » or buy at the « highest price » in order to have their order fulfilled. Once you buy (or sell) the balances get adjusted accordingly
The idea of perception is important, especially in investing. As you gain more knowledge about investments – for example, how stocks are bought and sold, how much volatility (price change) is usually present, and the difficulty or ease of liquidating an investment – you are likely to consider stock investments to have less risk than you thought before making your first purchase. As a consequence, your anxiety when investing is less intense, even though your risk tolerance remains unchanged because your perception of the risk has evolved.

Competition has spurred many brokerages to slash commission fees, which can add up quickly if you buy and sell stocks, mutual funds or ETFs frequently. Robinhood is not the only company that does not charge commission fees. Starting in October, Interactive Brokers is providing an unlimited number of commission-free trades on U.S. exchange-traded stocks and ETFs along with no account minimums or inactivity fees.
Leverage simply means the use of borrowed money to execute your stock market strategy. In a margin account, banks and brokerage firms can loan you money to buy stocks, usually 50% of the purchase value. In other words, if you wanted to buy 100 shares of a stock trading at $100 for a total cost of $10,000, your brokerage firm could loan you $5,000 to complete the purchase.
In most cases, your broker will charge a commission every time that you trade stock, either through buying or selling. Trading fees range from the low end of $2 per trade but can be as high as $10 for some discount brokers. Some brokers charge no trade commissions at all, but they make up for it in other ways. There are no charitable organizations running brokerage services.
The first three points are easy to a certain extent. The point about what to invest into will be covered later on in this guide and will dictate your placement strategy. The final point, about technical expertise, will also dictate what you can and cannot do. Every cryptocurrency has its own specifics, its own wallet (a wallet is where you store your cryptocurrency, more on that later), some are easier to use, some are complicated, not all the cryptocurrencies especially emerging ones have widespread platform support (some only have Windows-based or Linux-based clients, some have also MacOS integration, some support mobile clients etc.) I will cover this in the « Wallets » section.
Why I’m buying: Spell out what you find attractive about the company and the opportunity you see for the future. What are your expectations? What metrics matter most and what milestones will you use to judge the company’s progress? Catalog the potential pitfalls and mark which ones would be game-changers and which would be signs of a temporary setback.
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