Choosing the right stock can be a fool's errand, but investing in high-quality stocks such as blue chips and dividend-yielding ones are often good strategies. One reason investors opt for blue chips is because of the potential for growth and stability and because they produce dividends - these include companies such as Microsoft (ticker: MSFT), Coca-Cola Co. (KO) and Procter & Gamble Co. (PG). Coco-Cola, for example, generates a dividend of 2.9%, and the stock is less volatile as its share price has hovered between $44 and $55 during the past 52 weeks. Dividends can generate much-needed income for investors, especially higher-dividend ones.
Now I know GE has been a dog for the last couple of years, shares are down 60% since the 2016 high. But management has made the tough decisions, selling off some assets and spinning off others. Cash flow is protected and I don’t think the market is giving the company credit for it yet. I think a solid turnaround in stock price could start in 2020 with even more gains over the next five years.
Arbitraging can be very lucrative especially with Asian markets (South Korea for example) where cryptocurrencies are exchanged at premium rates, but due to the high volatility of the markets and the congestion on major cryptocurrencies (Bitcoin and Ethereum) it is becoming increasingly difficult to do arbitraging because of potential incurred losses. Add to this the fact that exchanges need a certain amount of confirmations before balances are made available for trading and it makes it quite risky at least for Bitcoin and Ethereum.
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It depends. 24/7 support is essential to some investors, while others may be completely fine using online chat during regular market hours or receiving an email back within one business day. That said, most investors neglect to think about a market crisis like a flash crash. In our experience, it certainly doesn't hurt to have reliable customer service available for whenever the need may arise.


If there are any lessons to be learned from the American sub-prime mortgage crisis, the 2008 stock market crash (information here) and Wall Street bailout that followed - and there are lots of lessons - it is that borrowed money can be very dangerous in investments, even when it is being handled professionally. The failure of LTCM, Bear Stearns, Lehman Brothers, Northern Rock and many others shows just how precarious a business model can be with too much gearing.
Regarding your private keys, can either keep them on a software wallet, or on a hardware wallet. The software wallet is the easiest way for beginners, but it implies that you have a computer that is properly secured (strong password, antivirus etc.) and that you do backups of your data. Remember, if you lose your private keys, the money is gone forever. As you get into cryptocurrencies more seriously, you will inevitably look for a hardware wallet, which is a dedicated device resistant to hacking where you can store your private keys (or to say it in an easy way, your crypto assets/invested money). I have already written an article on a hardware wallet, the TREZOR (see here). The most common wallets are the TREZOR and the Ledger Nano S. The TREZOR has a new model being sold from January 2018 (Model T) which will support much more currencies than the current TREZOR. The Ledger Nano S has more integrations currently, but I would recommend to wait for the TREZOR T to judge properly. Those devices usually cost around 100 USD, so once you have more than 100 USD to protect it starts making sense to get one.
Though it is called a stock market or equity market and is primarily known for trading stocks/equities, other financial securities - like exchange traded funds (ETF), corporate bonds and derivatives based on stocks, commodities, currencies, and bonds - are also traded in the stock markets. (For related reading, see "What's the Difference Between the Equity Market and the Stock Market?")
Many online brokerages do not limit their customers to just online stock trading. Full-service brokerages offer banking services including checking accounts, savings accounts, credit cards, mortgages, and more with deposits of up to $250,000 backed by the FDIC. Bank of America (Merrill Edge) and Chase (Chase You Invest Trade) are two examples of banks that also offer online trading.

To make comparisons between companies, sectors and markets a little easier, there are a number of mathematical models used. The most common and often the most helpful is the P/E ratio. The Price to Earnings ratio takes the share price and is divided by the earnings per share. It is possible to calculate this using past earnings, projected future earnings and with all sorts of moving averages ;-) Therefore, this is one number that it is vital for any investor to know and understand.
The first three points are easy to a certain extent. The point about what to invest into will be covered later on in this guide and will dictate your placement strategy. The final point, about technical expertise, will also dictate what you can and cannot do. Every cryptocurrency has its own specifics, its own wallet (a wallet is where you store your cryptocurrency, more on that later), some are easier to use, some are complicated, not all the cryptocurrencies especially emerging ones have widespread platform support (some only have Windows-based or Linux-based clients, some have also MacOS integration, some support mobile clients etc.) I will cover this in the « Wallets » section.
Bernard Baruch, known as “The Lone Wolf of Wall Street,” owned his own seat on the New York Stock Exchange by age 30 and became of the country’s best known financiers by 1910. Mr. Baruch, while a master of his profession, had no illusions about the difficulties of successful stock market investing, saying, “The main purpose of the stock market is to make fools of as many men as possible.” According to Ken Little, author of 15 books on investing and personal finance topics, “If you are an individual investor in the stock market, you should know that the system stacks the deck in its favor.”
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