D (Weak) - The stock has underperformed the universe of other funds given the level of risk in its underlying investments, resulting in a weak risk-adjusted performance. Thus, its investment strategy and/or management has not been attuned to capitalize on the recent economic environment. While the risk-adjusted performance of any stock is subject to change, we believe that this fund has proven to be a bad investment over the recent past.

Risk tolerance is a psychological trait that is genetically based, but positively influenced by education, income, and wealth (as these increase, risk tolerance appears to increase slightly) and negatively by age (as one gets older, risk tolerance decreases). Your risk tolerance is how you feel about risk and the degree of anxiety you feel when risk is present. In psychological terms, risk tolerance is defined as “the extent to which a person chooses to risk experiencing a less favorable outcome in the pursuit of a more favorable outcome.” In other words, would you risk $100 to win $1,000? Or $1,000 to win $1,000? All humans vary in their risk tolerance, and there is no “right” balance.
Like with the real world market, investing in a highly volatile market is a risky approach that can make you extremely rich or bring you to your knees. Besides the common sense approach to invest moderately (to limit the exposure of your other savings and personal finance needs), it is also recommended to spread the risk of investing in a volatile market amongst multiple assets.
If there are any lessons to be learned from the American sub-prime mortgage crisis, the 2008 stock market crash (information here) and Wall Street bailout that followed - and there are lots of lessons - it is that borrowed money can be very dangerous in investments, even when it is being handled professionally. The failure of LTCM, Bear Stearns, Lehman Brothers, Northern Rock and many others shows just how precarious a business model can be with too much gearing.

Once you have a specific set of entry rules, scan through more charts to see if those conditions are generated each day (assuming you want to day trade every day) and more often than not produce a price move in the anticipated direction. If so, you have a potential entry point for a strategy. You'll then need to assess how to exit, or sell, those trades.


Altcoins are tied to the Bitcoin markets, if Bitcoin takes a hit there’s a high probability that altcoins will also suffer, so you’re looking at that moment to jump in: when others are panic selling, you should be investing. Also, there is a sort of tidal lock between altcoins and Bitcoin. Never take a green market (prices going up) for your preferred project finally breaking through. It could just be that the rise of Bitcoin price brings everything up organically, so you may be advise to check whether your project’s value in Bitcoin (not in US dollars or any other fiat currency) has changed or if it has stayed more or less the same. This is usually visible on cryptocurrency only exchanges where Bitcoin is often the de-facto main exchange currency.
The stock market is made up of exchanges, like the New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq. Stocks are listed on a specific exchange, which brings buyers and sellers together and acts as a market for the shares of those stocks. The exchange tracks the supply and demand — and directly related, the price — of each stock. (Need to back up a bit? Read our explainer about stocks.)
If the strategy is within your risk limit, then testing begins. Manually go through historical charts to find your entries, noting whether your stop loss or target would have been hit. Paper trade in this way for at least 50 to 100 trades, noting whether the strategy was profitable and if it meets your expectations. If it does, proceed to trading the strategy in a demo account in real time. If it's profitable over the course of two months or more in a simulated environment, proceed with day trading the strategy with real capital. If the strategy isn't profitable, start over.
This is a more advanced topic for those who want to do what is called « day trading », i.e. those who plan to buy and sell on a daily basis as their main activity. Arbitraging is the process of leveraging price differences between exchanges to make a profit, by buying cryptocurrency cheap on a given exchange and selling it for a higher price on a different exchange.

There are two types of brokers: full-service and discount. Full-service brokers tailor recommendations and charge higher fees, service charges, and commissions. Most investors are willing to pay these higher fees because of the research and resources these companies provide. With a discount broker, the majority of research falls on the investor; they just provide a platform to perform trades and customer support when needed. Newer investors can benefit from the resources provided by full-service brokers, while frequent traders and experienced investors who perform their own research may lean towards platforms with no commission fee.
The recent market turbulence from the coronavirus pandemic has reinforced the importance of this approach. The stock market has recently gone through each of the three possible stages: market in confirmed uptrend, uptrend under pressure and market in correction. To stay protected throughout these changes, follow the No. 1 rule of investing: Always cut your losses short. While you can't control what the stock market does, this basic rule lets you control how you react.
Alternatively, you may be looking at digging hidden gems that may be well below the top 50 or top 100 projects, but still have a very solid technology or are undervalued. Doing your own research may help here, but of course it will require more investment and time spent, with a possibly longer ROI (Return on Investment) but the hope of higher gains.

Successful traders have to move fast, but they don't have to think fast. Why? Because they've developed a trading strategy in advance, along with the discipline to stick to that strategy. It is important to follow your formula closely rather than try to chase profits. Don't let your emotions get the best of you and abandon your strategy. There's a mantra among day traders: "Plan your trade and trade your plan."
The stock market refers to the collection of markets and exchanges where regular activities of buying, selling, and issuance of shares of publicly-held companies take place. Such financial activities are conducted through institutionalized formal exchanges or over-the-counter (OTC) marketplaces which operate under a defined set of regulations. There can be multiple stock trading venues in a country or a region which allow transactions in stocks and other forms of securities.
The Intelligent Investor by Ben Graham ought to be required reading for every private investor. While the innovations he brought to stock analysis have long been outdated and the red flags he used to watch out for in a company's accounts are now regulated against by the SEC, many of his insights about thinking about investment still stand. For example, his description of Mr Market is still an excellent way of understanding how a crowd moves with the daily news.
Blue-chip stocks—which get their name from poker, where the most valuable playing chip color is blue—are well-known, well-established companies that have a history of paying out consistent dividends, regardless of the economic conditions. Investors like them because they tend to grow dividend rates faster than the rate of inflation, so the owner increases income without having to buy another share. Blue-chip stocks are not flashy, but they have solid balance sheets and steady returns.
A stock's market capitalization (cap) is the sum of the total shares outstanding multiplied by price. For example, if a company has 1 million outstanding shares priced at $50, its market cap would be $50 million. It has more meaning than the share price because it allows you to evaluate a company in the context of similar-sized companies in its industry. A small-cap company with a capitalization of $500 million shouldn't be compared to a large-cap company worth more than $10 billion. Here are how companies are generally grouped:
Finally, you’re going to be looking for catalysts or roadblocks to growth for each company. This means looking in the financial news, reading analyst reports and management presentations. By this time in the process, maybe you’re only looking at four to six companies in a sector so this level of deep research won’t take more than a couple of hours.

As written in section Investing 3, you should never keep any valuable assets on an exchange, unless you engage in day trading. You should get an appropriate wallet to store your cryptocurrency safely. To explain the concept better, what you are storing is not the cryptocurrency itself, but your private keys, the keys that allow you to spend the cryptocurrency that is assigned to you and stored on the blockchain of the given cryptocurrency (of course each project has its own blockchain, just like each bank has its own internal banking system – to simplify heavily). Anyone who has access to your private key is in control of your cryptocurrency assets, so you must secure them. Most if not all of the wallets around have a feature called a backup phrase. It is a mnemonic sequence of words that must be written on paper and stored securely. If you lose access to your wallet, get it lost or stolen or whatever, this backup phrase should allow you to recover instantly access to your private keys and funds, after which you should immediately transfer them to a new address.
Define and write down the conditions under which you'll enter a position. "Buy during uptrend" isn't specific enough. Something like this is much more specific and also testable: "Buy when price breaks above the upper trendline of a triangle pattern, where the triangle was preceded by an uptrend (at least one higher swing high and higher swing low before the triangle formed) on the two-minute chart in the first two hours of the trading day."
Competition has spurred many brokerages to slash commission fees, which can add up quickly if you buy and sell stocks, mutual funds or ETFs frequently. Robinhood is not the only company that does not charge commission fees. Starting in October, Interactive Brokers is providing an unlimited number of commission-free trades on U.S. exchange-traded stocks and ETFs along with no account minimums or inactivity fees.
Altcoins are tied to the Bitcoin markets, if Bitcoin takes a hit there’s a high probability that altcoins will also suffer, so you’re looking at that moment to jump in: when others are panic selling, you should be investing. Also, there is a sort of tidal lock between altcoins and Bitcoin. Never take a green market (prices going up) for your preferred project finally breaking through. It could just be that the rise of Bitcoin price brings everything up organically, so you may be advise to check whether your project’s value in Bitcoin (not in US dollars or any other fiat currency) has changed or if it has stayed more or less the same. This is usually visible on cryptocurrency only exchanges where Bitcoin is often the de-facto main exchange currency.
The first three points are easy to a certain extent. The point about what to invest into will be covered later on in this guide and will dictate your placement strategy. The final point, about technical expertise, will also dictate what you can and cannot do. Every cryptocurrency has its own specifics, its own wallet (a wallet is where you store your cryptocurrency, more on that later), some are easier to use, some are complicated, not all the cryptocurrencies especially emerging ones have widespread platform support (some only have Windows-based or Linux-based clients, some have also MacOS integration, some support mobile clients etc.) I will cover this in the « Wallets » section.
You may decide to invest ad-hoc or on a regular schedule basis. You may for example want to invest 40% of your allotted funds into mainstream, “secure” investments such as Bitcoin, Ethereum or Zcash. You may decide to spread out the remaining 60% to cryptocurrencies listed in the top 20 or top 30 projects based on capitalization on coinmarketcap, if you feel this is a secure strategy.
The stock exchanges also maintain all company news, announcements, and financial reporting, which can be usually accessed on their official websites. A stock exchange also supports various other corporate-level, transaction-related activities. For instance, profitable companies may reward investors by paying dividends which usually comes from a part of the company’s earnings. The exchange maintains all such information and may support its processing to a certain extent. (For related reading, see "How Does the Stock Market Work?")
The two main types of IRAs are Roth and Traditional, and the difference between them has to do with when you pay taxes. With a Roth IRA, you contribute money after taxes, so your withdrawals are tax-free in retirement. In most cases, contributions to a Traditional IRA are tax deductible, but you'll pay taxes when you withdraw money in retirement.
It depends. 24/7 support is essential to some investors, while others may be completely fine using online chat during regular market hours or receiving an email back within one business day. That said, most investors neglect to think about a market crisis like a flash crash. In our experience, it certainly doesn't hurt to have reliable customer service available for whenever the need may arise.
His book is a big beast at more than 600 pages and will need to be committed to, but it offers some fantastic insights into how to invest safely and profitably for the long-term and how to make your money work harder. Having interviewed all these legendary traders and investors, the book contains some excellent insights into asset allocation and portfolio planning that almost everyone should gain some benefit from reading.
The exchange also earns from selling market data generated on its platform - like real-time data, historical data, summary data, and reference data – which is vital for equity research and other uses. Many exchanges will also sell technology products, like a trading terminal and dedicated network connection to the exchange, to the interested parties for a suitable fee.

Phrases like “earnings movers” and “intraday highs” don’t mean much to the average investor, and in many cases, they shouldn’t. If you’re in it for the long term — with, say, a portfolio of mutual funds geared toward retirement — you don’t need to worry about what these words mean, or about the flashes of red or green that cross the bottom of your TV screen. You can get by just fine without understanding the stock market much at all.


When you buy some cryptocurrency, the money will be withdrawn from your bank account or card and you will be credited in your exchange in a sum matching the cryptocurrency you have purchased. Each exchange may allow you to trade for one or more cryptocurrencies. Each cryptocurrency on the exchange will have its own wallet. You can store your cryptocurrency on an exchange but it’s not a recommended practice. I will cover this in a section called Wallets.

Since Betterment launched, other robo-first companies have been founded, and established online brokers like Charles Schwab have added robo-like advisory services. According to a report by Charles Schwab, 58% of Americans say they will use some sort of robo-advice by 2025. If you want an algorithm to make investment decisions for you, including tax-loss harvesting and rebalancing, a robo-advisor may be for you. And as the success of index investing has shown, if your goal is long-term wealth building, you might do better with a robo-advisor.
The use of borrowed money “levers” or exaggerates the result of price movement. Suppose the stock moves to $200 a share and you sell it. If you had used your own money exclusively, your return would be 100% on your investment [($20,000 -$10,000)/$10,000]. If you had borrowed $5,000 to buy the stock and sold at $200 per share, your return would be 300 % [(20,000-$5,000)/$5,000] after repaying the $5,000 loan and excluding the cost of interest paid to the broker.
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