However, it might be best to not become too much of a market "expert". Some of the most famous and successful investors of all time, such as Peter Lynch, the famed manager of the huge Fidelity Magellan fund. He suggested that looking for clues in normal life is a great way to find opportunities. Lynch used to closely follow the shopping habits of his wife to see what brands people were buying. He believed that most people working professionally on the NYSE lived in a bubble.

Crypto-only exchanges do not handle any fiat currency, they don’t work at all with « real world money ». They will however allow you to trade a very large amount of cryptocurrencies. They have « markets », where you can exchange mainstream cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin (BTC), Ethereum (ETH) or Litecoin (LTC) for other less known cryptocurrencies. They will offer similar services as advanced exchanges but you will not be able to cash out. You would have to convert the cryptocurrencies you own to a more common one (BTC, ETH or LTC for example), send it to one of the fiat to cryptocurrency exchanges, and then transfer it to your account. Alternatively, you could also just decide to pay for goods and services in cryptocurrency. Or you could also withdraw the money via Bitcoin ATMs (where you send Bitcoin to an address and get cash, just like you would on a regular ATM).

The first three points are easy to a certain extent. The point about what to invest into will be covered later on in this guide and will dictate your placement strategy. The final point, about technical expertise, will also dictate what you can and cannot do. Every cryptocurrency has its own specifics, its own wallet (a wallet is where you store your cryptocurrency, more on that later), some are easier to use, some are complicated, not all the cryptocurrencies especially emerging ones have widespread platform support (some only have Windows-based or Linux-based clients, some have also MacOS integration, some support mobile clients etc.) I will cover this in the « Wallets » section.
Buy in thirds: Like dollar-cost averaging, “buying in thirds” helps you avoid the morale-crushing experience of bumpy results right out of the gate. Divide the amount you want to invest by three and then, as the name implies, pick three separate points to buy shares. These can be at regular intervals (e.g., monthly or quarterly) or based on performance or company events. For example, you might buy shares before a product is released and put the next third of your money into play if it’s a hit — or divert the remaining money elsewhere if it’s not.
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