When thinking about a stock exchange it is worth remembering that it is a capital market. The primary purpose of a capital market is to enable businesses to raise money to provide working capital to fund expansion and growth. In exchange for this money, the companies issue equity in the form of stock, creating stockholders. Each stockholder ownes a piece of the active business relative to the amount of money they invested.
Say, a U.S.-based software company is trading at a price of $100 and has a market capitalization of $5 billion. A news item comes in that the EU regulator has imposed a fine of $2 billion on the company which essentially means that 40 percent of the company’s value may be wiped out. While the stock market may have imposed a trading price range of $90 and $110 on the company’s share price, it should efficiently change the permissible trading price limit to accommodate for the possible changes in the share price, else shareholders may struggle to trade at a fair price.
On when to buy, my recommendation is to avoid jumping into the pump train when you see a cryptocurrency price rising very fast. Fear of missing out is a very potent psychological trigger for us humans and if you see something rising fast the first thing you’ll want to do is buy some so that you don’t feel left out. Go for the dip, but go for the dip reasonably: identify the cryptocurrencies you want to own, ideally solid ones based on your own research (it’s important not to invest in crappy projects), and when you see them taking the plunge go grab some big chunks.
The first three points are easy to a certain extent. The point about what to invest into will be covered later on in this guide and will dictate your placement strategy. The final point, about technical expertise, will also dictate what you can and cannot do. Every cryptocurrency has its own specifics, its own wallet (a wallet is where you store your cryptocurrency, more on that later), some are easier to use, some are complicated, not all the cryptocurrencies especially emerging ones have widespread platform support (some only have Windows-based or Linux-based clients, some have also MacOS integration, some support mobile clients etc.) I will cover this in the « Wallets » section.
Crypto-only exchanges do not handle any fiat currency, they don’t work at all with « real world money ». They will however allow you to trade a very large amount of cryptocurrencies. They have « markets », where you can exchange mainstream cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin (BTC), Ethereum (ETH) or Litecoin (LTC) for other less known cryptocurrencies. They will offer similar services as advanced exchanges but you will not be able to cash out. You would have to convert the cryptocurrencies you own to a more common one (BTC, ETH or LTC for example), send it to one of the fiat to cryptocurrency exchanges, and then transfer it to your account. Alternatively, you could also just decide to pay for goods and services in cryptocurrency. Or you could also withdraw the money via Bitcoin ATMs (where you send Bitcoin to an address and get cash, just like you would on a regular ATM).
By understanding your risk tolerance, you can avoid those investments which are likely to make you anxious. Generally speaking, you should never own an asset which keeps you from sleeping in the night. Anxiety stimulates fear which triggers emotional responses (rather than logical responses) to the stressor. During periods of financial uncertainty, the investor who can retain a cool head and follows an analytical decision process invariably comes out ahead.
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It pays to shop around some before deciding on where you want to open an account, and to check out our broker reviews. We list minimum deposits at the top of each review. Some firms do not require minimum deposits. Others may often lower costs, like trading fees and account management fees, if you have a balance above a certain threshold. Still, others may give a certain number of commission-free trades for opening an account.

Building a diversified portfolio is the priority for beginners who should consider adding index funds that capture the broader market, Swope says. Mutual funds and ETFs are the easiest solutions since they own hundreds to thousands of stocks and are less volatile than individual stocks. ETFs tend to have low minimums, allowing investors to spread their first $10,000 between a few funds and gain access to a variety of areas in the market, he says.


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You may decide to invest ad-hoc or on a regular schedule basis. You may for example want to invest 40% of your allotted funds into mainstream, “secure” investments such as Bitcoin, Ethereum or Zcash. You may decide to spread out the remaining 60% to cryptocurrencies listed in the top 20 or top 30 projects based on capitalization on coinmarketcap, if you feel this is a secure strategy.
Rarely is short-term noise (blaring headlines, temporary price fluctuations) relevant to how a well-chosen company performs over the long term. It’s how investors react to the noise that really matters. Here’s where that rational voice from calmer times — your investing journal — can serve as a guide to sticking it out during the inevitable ups and downs that come with investing in stocks.
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