Like with the real world market, investing in a highly volatile market is a risky approach that can make you extremely rich or bring you to your knees. Besides the common sense approach to invest moderately (to limit the exposure of your other savings and personal finance needs), it is also recommended to spread the risk of investing in a volatile market amongst multiple assets.

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The stock market is made up of exchanges, like the New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq. Stocks are listed on a specific exchange, which brings buyers and sellers together and acts as a market for the shares of those stocks. The exchange tracks the supply and demand — and directly related, the price — of each stock. (Need to back up a bit? Read our explainer about stocks.)

And you can find such stocks in lists like the IBD 50, Sector Leaders, IBD Big Cap 20, IBD Long-Term Leaders, and IPO Leaders. For example, fast-growing semiconductor designer and artificial intelligence (AI) stock Nvidia was featured on the IBD 50 before it surged 750%. And Apple has been featured on various IBD lists as it has made big moves in recent years. While, of course, not every stock featured on an IBD list will make the type of moves that Nvidia and Apple have made, it does show why it pays to regularly update your list of stocks to watch using these S&P 500-beating screens.
In contrast, professional fund managers (information here) do not want tips. They have dozens of good ideas of their own. They won't be sharing those ideas with you and they will not be expecting you to share yours. Instead, they ask about how you allocate money. "Which sectors and markets do you like and why?" The difference between these approaches is like night and day.
So you’ve seen it on TV, everybody talks about it in office or between friends, and everybody knows « that guy who invested xx months/years ago and is now rich », and you want in too. Like a vast majority of people, you are not in because you believe in the world-changing capabilities of cryptocurrencies but you just want to make some nice amounts of cash. Fair enough!
Blue-chip stocks—which get their name from poker, where the most valuable playing chip color is blue—are well-known, well-established companies that have a history of paying out consistent dividends, regardless of the economic conditions. Investors like them because they tend to grow dividend rates faster than the rate of inflation, so the owner increases income without having to buy another share. Blue-chip stocks are not flashy, but they have solid balance sheets and steady returns.
A stock's market capitalization (cap) is the sum of the total shares outstanding multiplied by price. For example, if a company has 1 million outstanding shares priced at $50, its market cap would be $50 million. It has more meaning than the share price because it allows you to evaluate a company in the context of similar-sized companies in its industry. A small-cap company with a capitalization of $500 million shouldn't be compared to a large-cap company worth more than $10 billion. Here are how companies are generally grouped:

Trading successfully is a lot easier when investors have great tools at their disposal. A top stock broker should offer access to a wide variety of trade tools to help make the most of each and every trade. From real-time streaming quotes to last sale tickers, quality stock scanners, mobile trading apps, and level II quotes to name a few. Strong tools are essential for active investors.
Why I’m buying: Spell out what you find attractive about the company and the opportunity you see for the future. What are your expectations? What metrics matter most and what milestones will you use to judge the company’s progress? Catalog the potential pitfalls and mark which ones would be game-changers and which would be signs of a temporary setback.
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