Before you start buying cryptocurrency, you must understand some concepts about investing. Remember, cryptocurrency markets are not regulated, so investor sentiment is aggravated by rumours, people spreading false information, « pump and dump » actions, « sell walls », FOMO (fear of missing out) and all sorts of manipulations including insider trading. Knowing these will hopefully help you rationalise your actions.
Preferred stocks are very different from shares of common stock most investors own. Holders of preferred stock are always the first to receive dividends, and in cases of bankruptcy, will be first to get paid. However, the stock price does not fluctuate the way common stock does, so some gains can be missed on companies with hypergrowth. Preferred shareholders also get no voting rights in company elections. They're a hybrid of common stock and bonds.
Thirty-two percent of Americans who were invested in the stock market during at least one of the last five financial downturns pulled some or all of their money out of the market. That’s according to a NerdWallet-commissioned survey, which was conducted online by The Harris Poll of more than 2,000 U.S. adults, among whom over 700 were invested in the stock market during at least one of the past five financial downturns, in June 2018. The survey also found that 28% of Americans would not keep their money in the stock market if there were a crash today.
The recent market turbulence from the coronavirus pandemic has reinforced the importance of this approach. The stock market has recently gone through each of the three possible stages: market in confirmed uptrend, uptrend under pressure and market in correction. To stay protected throughout these changes, follow the No. 1 rule of investing: Always cut your losses short. While you can't control what the stock market does, this basic rule lets you control how you react.
The stock market works like an auction, and buyers and sellers can be individuals, corporations, or governments. When there are more sellers than buyers, the price of a stock will go down. When there are more buyers than sellers, the price will go up. A company's performance doesn't directly influence its stock price; it's investors' reaction to the performance that decides how the stock fluctuates. If a company is performing well, more people will want to own the stock—consequently driving the price up. The opposite is true when a company underperforms.
In contrast, professional fund managers (information here) do not want tips. They have dozens of good ideas of their own. They won't be sharing those ideas with you and they will not be expecting you to share yours. Instead, they ask about how you allocate money. "Which sectors and markets do you like and why?" The difference between these approaches is like night and day.

Warning: Only invest in cryptocurrency what you can afford to lose! Be prepared to lose everything. Expect high fluctuations. Do not put in there money that is vital for you whether it is paying for rent, utilities, loans, mortgages or necessary goods (food & medicines). See this as spending money on collaterals or nice to have: restaurant, books, travelling, cinema etc.
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Define and write down the conditions under which you'll enter a position. "Buy during uptrend" isn't specific enough. Something like this is much more specific and also testable: "Buy when price breaks above the upper trendline of a triangle pattern, where the triangle was preceded by an uptrend (at least one higher swing high and higher swing low before the triangle formed) on the two-minute chart in the first two hours of the trading day."
A stop-loss order is designed to limit losses on a position in a security. For long positions, a stop loss can be placed below a recent low, or for short positions, above a recent high. It can also be based on volatility. For example, if a stock price is moving about $0.05 a minute, then you may place a stop loss $0.15 away from your entry to give the price some space to fluctuate before it moves in your anticipated direction.

By understanding your risk tolerance, you can avoid those investments which are likely to make you anxious. Generally speaking, you should never own an asset which keeps you from sleeping in the night. Anxiety stimulates fear which triggers emotional responses (rather than logical responses) to the stressor. During periods of financial uncertainty, the investor who can retain a cool head and follows an analytical decision process invariably comes out ahead.

Risk tolerance is also affected by one’s perception of the risk. For example, flying in an airplane or riding in a car would have been perceived as very risky in the early 1900s, but less so today as flight and automobile travel are common occurrences. Conversely, most people today would feel that riding a horse might be dangerous with a good chance of falling or being bucked off because few people are around horses.

Risk tolerance is a psychological trait that is genetically based, but positively influenced by education, income, and wealth (as these increase, risk tolerance appears to increase slightly) and negatively by age (as one gets older, risk tolerance decreases). Your risk tolerance is how you feel about risk and the degree of anxiety you feel when risk is present. In psychological terms, risk tolerance is defined as “the extent to which a person chooses to risk experiencing a less favorable outcome in the pursuit of a more favorable outcome.” In other words, would you risk $100 to win $1,000? Or $1,000 to win $1,000? All humans vary in their risk tolerance, and there is no “right” balance.
Finally, one point to mention is that a given cryptocurrency can be listed in more exchanges, with different listing prices (see below – Arbitraging). The best place to look for a cryptocurrency listing in term of total market capitalisation is Coinmarketcap. Cryptocurrencies are listed per descending order of market capitalisation; the site also allows to deep-dive on each cryptocurrency to see their value over time and where they are listed. Some cryptocurrencies may be listed on several exchanges but only 1 or 2 exchanges may see the critical mass of transactions taking place.
Before you start buying cryptocurrency, you must understand some concepts about investing. Remember, cryptocurrency markets are not regulated, so investor sentiment is aggravated by rumours, people spreading false information, « pump and dump » actions, « sell walls », FOMO (fear of missing out) and all sorts of manipulations including insider trading. Knowing these will hopefully help you rationalise your actions.

In late 2014, legendary self-help and business guru Tony Robbins published a book called Money: Master The Game. In it he explains the strategies and ideas used by the very best investors in the world - hedge fund managers, asset allocators and billionaires - that he gleaned from them during four years of interviews and how their lessons should be applied by the rest of us.


You may decide to invest ad-hoc or on a regular schedule basis. You may for example want to invest 40% of your allotted funds into mainstream, “secure” investments such as Bitcoin, Ethereum or Zcash. You may decide to spread out the remaining 60% to cryptocurrencies listed in the top 20 or top 30 projects based on capitalization on coinmarketcap, if you feel this is a secure strategy.
Risk tolerance is a psychological trait that is genetically based, but positively influenced by education, income, and wealth (as these increase, risk tolerance appears to increase slightly) and negatively by age (as one gets older, risk tolerance decreases). Your risk tolerance is how you feel about risk and the degree of anxiety you feel when risk is present. In psychological terms, risk tolerance is defined as “the extent to which a person chooses to risk experiencing a less favorable outcome in the pursuit of a more favorable outcome.” In other words, would you risk $100 to win $1,000? Or $1,000 to win $1,000? All humans vary in their risk tolerance, and there is no “right” balance.
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