When you buy some cryptocurrency, the money will be withdrawn from your bank account or card and you will be credited in your exchange in a sum matching the cryptocurrency you have purchased. Each exchange may allow you to trade for one or more cryptocurrencies. Each cryptocurrency on the exchange will have its own wallet. You can store your cryptocurrency on an exchange but it’s not a recommended practice. I will cover this in a section called Wallets.


A word on exchange balances: it is NOT RECOMMENDED to keep your cryptocurrency assets on exchanges. There are countless documented cases of people who lost access to their funds, either because their account was disabled, or because legislation forbade the exchange operator to give access to users based on their geographical location. Some exchanges have been hacked in the past and will be hacked. It is RECOMMENDED that you use your own wallets, that you secure them properly (more below) and that you limit the cryptocurrency held in exchanges only to carry the business/transactions you have to, and for the most limited amount of time, to reduce exposure.
Fees beyond trade commissions include inactivity fees (common with active trading brokers such as Interactive Brokers, Lightspeed, and TradeStation) and IRA fees for having a retirement account. While most brokers do not charge predatory fees, it’s still important to do your due diligence. Just like a bank account, stock brokers also make a portion of their profits off miscellaneous fees.

Insider trading: this is formally forbidden and punished in regular markets by stock exchanges organisations, but since crypto markets are unregulated, there is no way to apply any control here. Insider trading is when you have insider information about a project before anyone else or before the news hits the public, and you can thus acquire or sell a lot of cryptocurrency before the news break, allowing you to make huge profits, or to minimalise your losses.
1$0.00 commission applies to online U.S. equity trades, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), and options (+ $0.65 per contract fee) in a Fidelity retail account only for Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC retail clients. Sell orders are subject to an activity assessment fee (from $0.01 to $0.03 per $1,000 of principal). There is an Options Regulatory Fee (from $0.03 to $0.05 per contract), which applies to both option buy and sell transactions. The fee is subject to change. Other exclusions and conditions may apply. See Fidelity.com/commissions for details. Employee equity compensation transactions and accounts managed by advisors or intermediaries through Fidelity Clearing & Custody Solutions® are subject to different commission schedules. 

Why I’m buying: Spell out what you find attractive about the company and the opportunity you see for the future. What are your expectations? What metrics matter most and what milestones will you use to judge the company’s progress? Catalog the potential pitfalls and mark which ones would be game-changers and which would be signs of a temporary setback.
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