A stop-loss order is designed to limit losses on a position in a security. For long positions, a stop loss can be placed below a recent low, or for short positions, above a recent high. It can also be based on volatility. For example, if a stock price is moving about $0.05 a minute, then you may place a stop loss $0.15 away from your entry to give the price some space to fluctuate before it moves in your anticipated direction.
Most Wall Street pundits will tell you it's impossible to time the stock market. While it's unrealistic to think you'll get in at the very bottom and out at the very top of a market cycle, there are ways to spot major changes in market trends as they emerge. And by spotting those changes, you can position yourself to capture solid profits in a new market uptrend and keep the bulk of those gains when the market eventually enters a downturn.

Investment ideas can come from many places. If you want guidance from professional research services, you can turn to companies like Standard & Poor's, ValueLine, Morningstar, and other online resources. If the thought of spending your time browsing investment websites doesn't sound appealing, just take a look at your surroundings and see what people are interested in and buying.


It came out of the Great Recession, however, and that’s how bulls and bears tend to go: Bull markets are followed by bear markets, and vice versa, with both often signaling the start of larger economic patterns. In other words, a bull market typically means investors are confident, which indicates economic growth. A bear market shows investors are pulling back, indicating the economy may do so as well.
1$0.00 commission applies to online U.S. equity trades, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), and options (+ $0.65 per contract fee) in a Fidelity retail account only for Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC retail clients. Sell orders are subject to an activity assessment fee (from $0.01 to $0.03 per $1,000 of principal). There is an Options Regulatory Fee (from $0.03 to $0.05 per contract), which applies to both option buy and sell transactions. The fee is subject to change. Other exclusions and conditions may apply. See Fidelity.com/commissions for details. Employee equity compensation transactions and accounts managed by advisors or intermediaries through Fidelity Clearing & Custody Solutions® are subject to different commission schedules.

Warning: Only invest in cryptocurrency what you can afford to lose! Be prepared to lose everything. Expect high fluctuations. Do not put in there money that is vital for you whether it is paying for rent, utilities, loans, mortgages or necessary goods (food & medicines). See this as spending money on collaterals or nice to have: restaurant, books, travelling, cinema etc.


Merrill Edge is the online brokerage arm of Bank of America, which is open to all investors, regardless if they are a current banking customer. Alongside $0 trades, Merrill Edge offers excellent stock research (Merrill Edge was rated #1 for environmental, social, and governance “ESG” research). Also, Merrill Edge offers the best rewards program. Reward perks include credit card bonus cash back, savings interest bonuses, priority customer service, and more. My wife and I have personally been members of the program since it launched in 2014. It’s awesome. Full review.
A word on exchange balances: it is NOT RECOMMENDED to keep your cryptocurrency assets on exchanges. There are countless documented cases of people who lost access to their funds, either because their account was disabled, or because legislation forbade the exchange operator to give access to users based on their geographical location. Some exchanges have been hacked in the past and will be hacked. It is RECOMMENDED that you use your own wallets, that you secure them properly (more below) and that you limit the cryptocurrency held in exchanges only to carry the business/transactions you have to, and for the most limited amount of time, to reduce exposure.
An asset class that your author has been researching substantially is cryptocurrency. Bitcoin and the other alt coins, appear to be like very few other investment assets and so far moves in very different ways to almost every other asset. While it is very volatile and high risk and has quite a learning curve, it might be useful for some investors to understand and add to their portfolio.
About the author: Blain Reinkensmeyer As Head of Research at StockBrokers.com, Blain Reinkensmeyer has 18 years of trading experience with over 1,000 trades placed during that time. Referenced as a leading expert on the US online brokerage industry, Blain has been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Forbes, and the Chicago Tribune, among others.
Fear of missing out: the psychological concept of buying something because of the fear that we may miss out on hypothetical future earnings, or that the occasion is too good and might not present itself again. Abbreviated FOMO, this is typical of very huge sales/discounts, such as Black Friday, where people buy a lot of useless stuff because they fear they may miss out on a huge bargain. FOMO is very much linked with « pump and dump » movements.
The first stock market in the world was the London stock exchange. It was started in a coffeehouse, where traders used to meet to exchange shares, in 1773. The first stock exchange in the United States of America was started in Philadelphia in 1790. The Buttonwood agreement, so named because it was signed under a buttonwood tree, marked the beginnings of New York's Wall Street in 1792. The agreement was signed by 24 traders and was the first American organization of its kind to trade in securities. The traders renamed their venture as New York Stock and Exchange Board in 1817. (For related reading, see "The Highest Priced Stocks In America")
As a primary market, the stock market allows companies to issue and sell their shares to the common public for the first time through the process of initial public offerings (IPO). This activity helps companies raise necessary capital from investors. It essentially means that a company divides itself into a number of shares (say, 20 million shares) and sells a part of those shares (say, 5 million shares) to common public at a price (say, $10 per share).
This is a more advanced topic for those who want to do what is called « day trading », i.e. those who plan to buy and sell on a daily basis as their main activity. Arbitraging is the process of leveraging price differences between exchanges to make a profit, by buying cryptocurrency cheap on a given exchange and selling it for a higher price on a different exchange.
It’s likely some of these Americans might rethink pulling their money if they knew how quickly a portfolio can rebound from the bottom: The market took just 13 months to recover its losses after the most recent major sell-off in 2015. Even the Great Recession — a devastating downturn of historic proportions — posted a complete market recovery in just over five years. The S&P 500 then posted a compound annual growth rate of 16% from 2013 to 2017 (including dividends).
Sell walls: the action of artificially keeping the price of a cryptocurrency asset low by placing a large sell order. Large financial operators or investors (nicknamed « whales ») may want to artificially keep the price of a cryptocurrency low so that they can keep accumulating quietly, without causing a sharp rise in price. These are called « walls » because on exchanges, the graphics showing offer and demand will show a very high « wall » on the offer size. The mechanism is that the investor will put a very large sell order (usually 100 to 1000 times more cryptocurrency units than regular orders). Because of how exchanges operate, the sell will only take place if there is sufficient demand to fulfil the entire order, so smaller operators who have a real need/urge to sell would have to sell below that wall (i.e. cheaper) to make sure they can get paid. This will cause a condition where the price will stagnate, allowing those whales to put as much smaller buy orders as they need. Sell walls may be removed once the buying whales have reached their objectives.
Fear of missing out: the psychological concept of buying something because of the fear that we may miss out on hypothetical future earnings, or that the occasion is too good and might not present itself again. Abbreviated FOMO, this is typical of very huge sales/discounts, such as Black Friday, where people buy a lot of useless stuff because they fear they may miss out on a huge bargain. FOMO is very much linked with « pump and dump » movements.
The stock exchange shoulders the responsibility of ensuring price transparency, liquidity, price discovery and fair dealings in such trading activities. As almost all major stock markets across the globe now operate electronically, the exchange maintains trading systems that efficiently manage the buy and sell orders from various market participants. They perform the price matching function to facilitate trade execution at a price fair to both buyers and sellers.

The idea of perception is important, especially in investing. As you gain more knowledge about investments – for example, how stocks are bought and sold, how much volatility (price change) is usually present, and the difficulty or ease of liquidating an investment – you are likely to consider stock investments to have less risk than you thought before making your first purchase. As a consequence, your anxiety when investing is less intense, even though your risk tolerance remains unchanged because your perception of the risk has evolved.
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