3. Get an education. Warren Buffett has suggested in the past that every investor should be able to understand basic accountancy principles, an annual report and stock market history. You probably do not need to become an accountant, but being able to understand the scoring system of the game can only help. There are thousands of books about investing and trading - you don't need to read them all, but you probably ought to read a few to enhance your theoretical knowledge.
It is also worth trying to keep up to date with the latest thinking related to the area of investment that you are trying to specialise in. Therefore, if you plan to invest in defensive or income stocks, for example, it would be wise to read regularly about value investing and dividends. If you plan to invest in growth stocks, it would be wise to read about technology and the latest trends. Perhaps you could subscribe to one or more trade publications that relate to the sector(s) that you are most interested in.

Imagine owning stocks in five different companies, each of which you expect to continually grow profits. Unfortunately, circumstances change. At the end of the year, you might have two companies (A & B) that have performed well so their stocks are up 25% each. The stock of two other companies (C & D) in a different industry are up 10% each, while the fifth company’s (E) assets were liquidated to pay off a massive lawsuit.
As written in section Investing 3, you should never keep any valuable assets on an exchange, unless you engage in day trading. You should get an appropriate wallet to store your cryptocurrency safely. To explain the concept better, what you are storing is not the cryptocurrency itself, but your private keys, the keys that allow you to spend the cryptocurrency that is assigned to you and stored on the blockchain of the given cryptocurrency (of course each project has its own blockchain, just like each bank has its own internal banking system – to simplify heavily). Anyone who has access to your private key is in control of your cryptocurrency assets, so you must secure them. Most if not all of the wallets around have a feature called a backup phrase. It is a mnemonic sequence of words that must be written on paper and stored securely. If you lose access to your wallet, get it lost or stolen or whatever, this backup phrase should allow you to recover instantly access to your private keys and funds, after which you should immediately transfer them to a new address.
On when to buy, my recommendation is to avoid jumping into the pump train when you see a cryptocurrency price rising very fast. Fear of missing out is a very potent psychological trigger for us humans and if you see something rising fast the first thing you’ll want to do is buy some so that you don’t feel left out. Go for the dip, but go for the dip reasonably: identify the cryptocurrencies you want to own, ideally solid ones based on your own research (it’s important not to invest in crappy projects), and when you see them taking the plunge go grab some big chunks.

Traditional full-service stockbrokers do more than assist with the buying and selling of stocks or bonds. They often offer a wide array of services and products, including financial and retirement planning, investing and tax advice and regular portfolio updates. But they can charge substantial fees and transaction costs that can erode long-term investment gains.
The number of companies offering brokerage accounts has increased, including banks such as Ally Bank. Some brokerage companies provide a simplified version such as Robinhood where investors can buy and sell stocks, ETFs, options and cryptocurrency from a mobile app for free. Although Robinhood doesn't offer trade options for mutual funds or foreign stocks.
Dollar-cost average: This sounds complicated, but it’s not. Dollar-cost averaging means investing a set amount of money at regular intervals, such as once per week or month. That set amount buys more shares when the stock price goes down and fewer shares when it rises, but overall, it evens out the average price you pay. Some online brokerage firms let investors set up an automated investing schedule.
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