Balanced Regulation: Listed companies are largely regulated and their dealings are monitored by market regulators, like the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) of the U.S. Additionally, exchanges also mandate certain requirements – like, timely filing of quarterly financial reports and instant reporting of any relevant developments - to ensure all market participants become aware of corporate happenings. Failure to adhere to the regulations can lead to suspension of trading by the exchanges and other disciplinary measures.
Following the first-time share issuance IPO exercise called the listing process, the stock exchange also serves as the trading platform that facilitates regular buying and selling of the listed shares. This constitutes the secondary market. The stock exchange earns a fee for every trade that occurs on its platform during the secondary market activity.

If there are any lessons to be learned from the American sub-prime mortgage crisis, the 2008 stock market crash (information here) and Wall Street bailout that followed - and there are lots of lessons - it is that borrowed money can be very dangerous in investments, even when it is being handled professionally. The failure of LTCM, Bear Stearns, Lehman Brothers, Northern Rock and many others shows just how precarious a business model can be with too much gearing.
Astute readers will realise that the above guidance is mainly taking different angles to help prepare for and guide decision making by the investor. The ability to confidently make decisions is vital for investment profits and long-term success. This pdf about the decision making models of Charlie Munger (business partner to Warren Buffett at Berkshire Hathaway - both are certified investment immortals) is almost certain to prove helpful.
Altcoins are tied to the Bitcoin markets, if Bitcoin takes a hit there’s a high probability that altcoins will also suffer, so you’re looking at that moment to jump in: when others are panic selling, you should be investing. Also, there is a sort of tidal lock between altcoins and Bitcoin. Never take a green market (prices going up) for your preferred project finally breaking through. It could just be that the rise of Bitcoin price brings everything up organically, so you may be advise to check whether your project’s value in Bitcoin (not in US dollars or any other fiat currency) has changed or if it has stayed more or less the same. This is usually visible on cryptocurrency only exchanges where Bitcoin is often the de-facto main exchange currency.
The cryptocurrency market, while far from being in its infancy, is an extremely volatile market which is not subject to regulations, and thus can be subject to manipulations of all kind. There are many trends which impact operations on a daily basis: rumours can fuel the price of one cryptocurrency, some people or groups can apply « pump and dump » techniques etc. I will try to cover these, but please take good note of the following warning:
Plug Power is an excellent example of the volatility investors may experience when they buy stocks beneath $5 – in the early months of 2020, shares of Plug Power rocketed up over 80%, only to suffer 50% losses shortly thereafter. While speculators may have enjoyed the pop and drop, true investors would be wise to buy and hold Plug, which makes hydrogen fuel cells for commercial vehicles. Plug’s fuel cell shipments have increased dramatically over the last two years, and the company recently announced a partnership that will usher the world’s first fuel cell-powered, zero-emission commercial trucks onto the road. This opens Plug to new business opportunities as companies around the world turn toward clean energy solutions.
The performance data contained herein represents past performance which does not guarantee future results. Investment return and principal value will fluctuate so that shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance quoted. For performance information current to the most recent month end, please contact us.
Rarely is short-term noise (blaring headlines, temporary price fluctuations) relevant to how a well-chosen company performs over the long term. It’s how investors react to the noise that really matters. Here’s where that rational voice from calmer times — your investing journal — can serve as a guide to sticking it out during the inevitable ups and downs that come with investing in stocks.
×