Imagine owning stocks in five different companies, each of which you expect to continually grow profits. Unfortunately, circumstances change. At the end of the year, you might have two companies (A & B) that have performed well so their stocks are up 25% each. The stock of two other companies (C & D) in a different industry are up 10% each, while the fifth company’s (E) assets were liquidated to pay off a massive lawsuit.
Should the company management and majority owners choose, they can pay one or more dividends per year to stockholders. The money for these dividends will typically come from profits earned within the business. In most countries, these dividends are subject to income tax payable by the receiver. Often there is a withholding tax taken at source to ensure that non-resident shareholders pay as well. 

Fear of missing out: the psychological concept of buying something because of the fear that we may miss out on hypothetical future earnings, or that the occasion is too good and might not present itself again. Abbreviated FOMO, this is typical of very huge sales/discounts, such as Black Friday, where people buy a lot of useless stuff because they fear they may miss out on a huge bargain. FOMO is very much linked with « pump and dump » movements.
The number of companies offering brokerage accounts has increased, including banks such as Ally Bank. Some brokerage companies provide a simplified version such as Robinhood where investors can buy and sell stocks, ETFs, options and cryptocurrency from a mobile app for free. Although Robinhood doesn't offer trade options for mutual funds or foreign stocks.

His book is a big beast at more than 600 pages and will need to be committed to, but it offers some fantastic insights into how to invest safely and profitably for the long-term and how to make your money work harder. Having interviewed all these legendary traders and investors, the book contains some excellent insights into asset allocation and portfolio planning that almost everyone should gain some benefit from reading.


Regarding your private keys, can either keep them on a software wallet, or on a hardware wallet. The software wallet is the easiest way for beginners, but it implies that you have a computer that is properly secured (strong password, antivirus etc.) and that you do backups of your data. Remember, if you lose your private keys, the money is gone forever. As you get into cryptocurrencies more seriously, you will inevitably look for a hardware wallet, which is a dedicated device resistant to hacking where you can store your private keys (or to say it in an easy way, your crypto assets/invested money). I have already written an article on a hardware wallet, the TREZOR (see here). The most common wallets are the TREZOR and the Ledger Nano S. The TREZOR has a new model being sold from January 2018 (Model T) which will support much more currencies than the current TREZOR. The Ledger Nano S has more integrations currently, but I would recommend to wait for the TREZOR T to judge properly. Those devices usually cost around 100 USD, so once you have more than 100 USD to protect it starts making sense to get one.
Rarely is short-term noise (blaring headlines, temporary price fluctuations) relevant to how a well-chosen company performs over the long term. It’s how investors react to the noise that really matters. Here’s where that rational voice from calmer times — your investing journal — can serve as a guide to sticking it out during the inevitable ups and downs that come with investing in stocks.
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