His book is a big beast at more than 600 pages and will need to be committed to, but it offers some fantastic insights into how to invest safely and profitably for the long-term and how to make your money work harder. Having interviewed all these legendary traders and investors, the book contains some excellent insights into asset allocation and portfolio planning that almost everyone should gain some benefit from reading.

Insider trading: this is formally forbidden and punished in regular markets by stock exchanges organisations, but since crypto markets are unregulated, there is no way to apply any control here. Insider trading is when you have insider information about a project before anyone else or before the news hits the public, and you can thus acquire or sell a lot of cryptocurrency before the news break, allowing you to make huge profits, or to minimalise your losses.
Bernard Baruch, known as “The Lone Wolf of Wall Street,” owned his own seat on the New York Stock Exchange by age 30 and became of the country’s best known financiers by 1910. Mr. Baruch, while a master of his profession, had no illusions about the difficulties of successful stock market investing, saying, “The main purpose of the stock market is to make fools of as many men as possible.” According to Ken Little, author of 15 books on investing and personal finance topics, “If you are an individual investor in the stock market, you should know that the system stacks the deck in its favor.”

Buy in thirds: Like dollar-cost averaging, “buying in thirds” helps you avoid the morale-crushing experience of bumpy results right out of the gate. Divide the amount you want to invest by three and then, as the name implies, pick three separate points to buy shares. These can be at regular intervals (e.g., monthly or quarterly) or based on performance or company events. For example, you might buy shares before a product is released and put the next third of your money into play if it’s a hit — or divert the remaining money elsewhere if it’s not.

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