Some countries also tax money that is sitting in exchanges under the form of cryptocurrency. The USA tax this as « investment money », i.e. at the price level that it cost you to invest. Example: 5% investment tax. You invested 350 EUR in cryptocurrency. Regardless of its value now (whether 1 EUR or 150000 EUR), you pay 5% on the invested 350 EUR. However when you cash out you will have to declare this as financial income.
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (also referred to as "MLPF&S" or "Merrill") makes available certain investment products sponsored, managed, distributed or provided by companies that are affiliates of Bank of America Corporation ("BofA Corp."). MLPF&S is a registered broker-dealer, a registered investment adviser, Member Securities Investor Protection (SIPC) popup and a wholly owned subsidiary of Bank of America Corporation ("BofA Corp").

It depends. 24/7 support is essential to some investors, while others may be completely fine using online chat during regular market hours or receiving an email back within one business day. That said, most investors neglect to think about a market crisis like a flash crash. In our experience, it certainly doesn't hurt to have reliable customer service available for whenever the need may arise.
The stock exchanges also maintain all company news, announcements, and financial reporting, which can be usually accessed on their official websites. A stock exchange also supports various other corporate-level, transaction-related activities. For instance, profitable companies may reward investors by paying dividends which usually comes from a part of the company’s earnings. The exchange maintains all such information and may support its processing to a certain extent. (For related reading, see "How Does the Stock Market Work?")
The Intelligent Investor by Ben Graham ought to be required reading for every private investor. While the innovations he brought to stock analysis have long been outdated and the red flags he used to watch out for in a company's accounts are now regulated against by the SEC, many of his insights about thinking about investment still stand. For example, his description of Mr Market is still an excellent way of understanding how a crowd moves with the daily news.
Fear of missing out: the psychological concept of buying something because of the fear that we may miss out on hypothetical future earnings, or that the occasion is too good and might not present itself again. Abbreviated FOMO, this is typical of very huge sales/discounts, such as Black Friday, where people buy a lot of useless stuff because they fear they may miss out on a huge bargain. FOMO is very much linked with « pump and dump » movements.
Dividends are quarterly payments companies send out to their shareholders. Dividend investing refers to portfolios containing stocks that consistently issue dividend payments throughout the years. These stocks produce a reliable passive income stream that can be beneficial in retirement. You can't judge a stock by its dividend price alone, however. Sometimes companies will increase dividends as a way to attract investors when the underlying company is in trouble. If a company is offering high dividends, ask yourself why management isn't reinvesting some of that money in the company for growth.

A company's stock price has nothing to do with its value. A $50 stock can be more valuable than an $800 stock because the share price means nothing on its own. The relationship of price-to-earnings and net assets is what determines if a stock is overvalued or undervalued. Companies can keep prices artificially high by never conducting a stock split, yet not have the underlying foundational support. Make no assumptions based on price alone.

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