The challenge with Bitcoin and Ethereum these days is two-fold: first of all, both networks are congested with very high utilisation. How does that impacts us? Congestion means that there are more transactions to be processed than the system can actually ingest, which leads into transaction queuing. This means that those transactions will go in a wait list to be mined, and that means that it can take at least 20 minutes to a few hours for your transaction to be confirmed – a confirmation meaning that the transaction has been validated in at least one block. Going with BTC or LTC may result in longer times to get your money effectively transferred from one place to the other (for example if you want to store it securely on your wallet, or if you need to send it to an exchange). For transaction speed I prefer to go with Litecoin at the moment, except in cases where Bitcoin is still more advantageous. Keep in mind that despite the huge transaction fees Bitcoin sees massive adoption and has the first comer advantage.
The challenge with Bitcoin and Ethereum these days is two-fold: first of all, both networks are congested with very high utilisation. How does that impacts us? Congestion means that there are more transactions to be processed than the system can actually ingest, which leads into transaction queuing. This means that those transactions will go in a wait list to be mined, and that means that it can take at least 20 minutes to a few hours for your transaction to be confirmed – a confirmation meaning that the transaction has been validated in at least one block. Going with BTC or LTC may result in longer times to get your money effectively transferred from one place to the other (for example if you want to store it securely on your wallet, or if you need to send it to an exchange). For transaction speed I prefer to go with Litecoin at the moment, except in cases where Bitcoin is still more advantageous. Keep in mind that despite the huge transaction fees Bitcoin sees massive adoption and has the first comer advantage.
Finally, one point to mention is that a given cryptocurrency can be listed in more exchanges, with different listing prices (see below – Arbitraging). The best place to look for a cryptocurrency listing in term of total market capitalisation is Coinmarketcap. Cryptocurrencies are listed per descending order of market capitalisation; the site also allows to deep-dive on each cryptocurrency to see their value over time and where they are listed. Some cryptocurrencies may be listed on several exchanges but only 1 or 2 exchanges may see the critical mass of transactions taking place.
Secondly, this is a very vast topic and many people now trade and deal with cryptocurrency as their main day job. Startups and empires are built on it, so please understand this is a beginner’s guide and not the ultimate guide to the galaxy of cryptocurrencies. I will specifically limit myself to cryptocurrencies and will not cover ICOs (Initial Coin Offerings) as these are to me more investments into products or companies yet to be developed. This article will also not cover the relevancy or not of cryptocurrencies, it will not cover the famous Tulip Bubble, or any kind of philosophical concepts.
Sell walls: the action of artificially keeping the price of a cryptocurrency asset low by placing a large sell order. Large financial operators or investors (nicknamed « whales ») may want to artificially keep the price of a cryptocurrency low so that they can keep accumulating quietly, without causing a sharp rise in price. These are called « walls » because on exchanges, the graphics showing offer and demand will show a very high « wall » on the offer size. The mechanism is that the investor will put a very large sell order (usually 100 to 1000 times more cryptocurrency units than regular orders). Because of how exchanges operate, the sell will only take place if there is sufficient demand to fulfil the entire order, so smaller operators who have a real need/urge to sell would have to sell below that wall (i.e. cheaper) to make sure they can get paid. This will cause a condition where the price will stagnate, allowing those whales to put as much smaller buy orders as they need. Sell walls may be removed once the buying whales have reached their objectives.
A stock split is when a company increases its total shares by dividing up the ones it currently has. It is typically done on a 2:1 ratio. For example, if you own 100 shares of a stock priced at $80 per share, after the split, you'll have 200 shares priced at $40 each. The number of shares changes, but the value remains the same. Stock splits occur when prices are increasing in a way that deters and disadvantages smaller investors. They can also keep the trading volume up by creating a larger buying pool to trade. If you invest in a stock, expect to experience a stock split at some point.
In most cases, your broker will charge a commission every time that you trade stock, either through buying or selling. Trading fees range from the low end of $2 per trade but can be as high as $10 for some discount brokers. Some brokers charge no trade commissions at all, but they make up for it in other ways. There are no charitable organizations running brokerage services.
Astute readers will realise that the above guidance is mainly taking different angles to help prepare for and guide decision making by the investor. The ability to confidently make decisions is vital for investment profits and long-term success. This pdf about the decision making models of Charlie Munger (business partner to Warren Buffett at Berkshire Hathaway - both are certified investment immortals) is almost certain to prove helpful.
Market Depth – the Market Depth view shows the total cumulated offer and demand for a given cryptocurrency. This is the place where we can identify the « sell walls » I was talking about in a previous section. A market that is not manipulated (or at least not overtly) will have a stair-shaped graph on both sizes, with people willing to buy or sell at different values.
Finally, one point to mention is that a given cryptocurrency can be listed in more exchanges, with different listing prices (see below – Arbitraging). The best place to look for a cryptocurrency listing in term of total market capitalisation is Coinmarketcap. Cryptocurrencies are listed per descending order of market capitalisation; the site also allows to deep-dive on each cryptocurrency to see their value over time and where they are listed. Some cryptocurrencies may be listed on several exchanges but only 1 or 2 exchanges may see the critical mass of transactions taking place.
Altcoins are tied to the Bitcoin markets, if Bitcoin takes a hit there’s a high probability that altcoins will also suffer, so you’re looking at that moment to jump in: when others are panic selling, you should be investing. Also, there is a sort of tidal lock between altcoins and Bitcoin. Never take a green market (prices going up) for your preferred project finally breaking through. It could just be that the rise of Bitcoin price brings everything up organically, so you may be advise to check whether your project’s value in Bitcoin (not in US dollars or any other fiat currency) has changed or if it has stayed more or less the same. This is usually visible on cryptocurrency only exchanges where Bitcoin is often the de-facto main exchange currency.
You can buy stock directly using a brokerage account or one of the many available investment apps. These platforms give you the option to buy, sell, and store your purchased stocks, and the differences between them are mostly in fees and available resources. While traditional brokerage companies—like Fidelity, E-Trade, and TD Ameritrade—charge a commission fee per trade, newer companies like Robinhood and WeBull offer zero-commission trades.
It’s all fun and games until the taxman passes. There is no clear legislation on taxes and it varies on per case and per country basis. My personal recommendation is to declare the money you cash out on your tax form. This would normally be taxed as « financial income money », just like if you sold shares or cashed out money from the income of your own company (like when you get paid dividends). Example: 15% financial income tax. You cash out 10000 EUR, you get taxed 15% on this.
If you have a job, your employer may offer a 401k or 403b retirement plan as part of your benefits package. These accounts invest your money for retirement, but your investment options are limited to the choices provided by your employer and plan provider. If your employer doesn't offer a retirement plan, you can open an IRA on your own with your bank or brokerage company.
Many online brokerages do not limit their customers to just online stock trading. Full-service brokerages offer banking services including checking accounts, savings accounts, credit cards, mortgages, and more with deposits of up to $250,000 backed by the FDIC. Bank of America (Merrill Edge) and Chase (Chase You Invest Trade) are two examples of banks that also offer online trading.
There are two types of stock research: fundamental and technical. Fundamental research explores company metrics such as earnings growth, earnings per share (EPS), debt, sales growth, and market capitalization. Meanwhile, technical analysis is all about learning how to read a stock chart and use historical price performance to help you predict future price direction. The best online brokerages offer tools to cover both types thoroughly, and we checked for 54 individual features during our 2020 Review. To compare research features, use the online brokerage comparison tool.
You can buy stock directly using a brokerage account or one of the many available investment apps. These platforms give you the option to buy, sell, and store your purchased stocks, and the differences between them are mostly in fees and available resources. While traditional brokerage companies—like Fidelity, E-Trade, and TD Ameritrade—charge a commission fee per trade, newer companies like Robinhood and WeBull offer zero-commission trades.
When thinking about the mindset of investors, The Great Crash 1929 by J.K.Galbraith (reviewed here) should also be required reading. Typically, any sustained fall in prices - known as a bear market - is very destructive to wealth. However, as Galbraith explains wonderfully, each bear market is unique and is a reflection of the bull market that came before it. The book explains a great deal about the feedback loops that can exist when prices rise and fall as more people are either sucked into or forced out of holdings. It is the reference work about a very important slice of Wall Street history.
Bob wants to buy Ethereum. He only has Bitcoin. On an instant-access exchange, he will trade Bitcoin for Ethereum. He will provide the target address of his Ethereum wallet to receive the Ethereum he wants to purchase, and he will also provide a refund address for Bitcoin, most likely the address from which he will be sending his Bitcoin to the exchange. Once he will submit the order, Bob will be asked by the exchange to send the necessary amount of Bitcoin to an address. Once he will send this money and it is confirmed, the instant-access exchange will handle all the buy/sell operations on his behalf, and will send the Ethereum once the order has been fulfilled.
Market Depth – the Market Depth view shows the total cumulated offer and demand for a given cryptocurrency. This is the place where we can identify the « sell walls » I was talking about in a previous section. A market that is not manipulated (or at least not overtly) will have a stair-shaped graph on both sizes, with people willing to buy or sell at different values.

It’s likely some of these Americans might rethink pulling their money if they knew how quickly a portfolio can rebound from the bottom: The market took just 13 months to recover its losses after the most recent major sell-off in 2015. Even the Great Recession — a devastating downturn of historic proportions — posted a complete market recovery in just over five years. The S&P 500 then posted a compound annual growth rate of 16% from 2013 to 2017 (including dividends).
When thinking about the mindset of investors, The Great Crash 1929 by J.K.Galbraith (reviewed here) should also be required reading. Typically, any sustained fall in prices - known as a bear market - is very destructive to wealth. However, as Galbraith explains wonderfully, each bear market is unique and is a reflection of the bull market that came before it. The book explains a great deal about the feedback loops that can exist when prices rise and fall as more people are either sucked into or forced out of holdings. It is the reference work about a very important slice of Wall Street history.

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Thirty-two percent of Americans who were invested in the stock market during at least one of the last five financial downturns pulled some or all of their money out of the market. That’s according to a NerdWallet-commissioned survey, which was conducted online by The Harris Poll of more than 2,000 U.S. adults, among whom over 700 were invested in the stock market during at least one of the past five financial downturns, in June 2018. The survey also found that 28% of Americans would not keep their money in the stock market if there were a crash today.


Discount brokers used to be the exception, but now they're the norm. Discount online brokers give you tools to select and place your own transactions, and many of them also offer a set-it-and-forget-it robo-advisory service too. As the space of financial services has progressed in the 21st century, online brokers have added more features including educational materials on their sites and mobile apps.
A person who feels negative about the market is called a “bear,” while their positive counterpart is called a “bull.” During market hours, the constant battle between the bulls and the bears is reflected in the constantly changing price of securities. These short-term movements are driven by rumors, speculations, and hopes – emotions – rather than logic and a systematic analysis of the company’s assets, management, and prospects.
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