Buy & Sell Orders – each exchange has their own method of placing buy or sell orders but generally speaking the interface is similar as that of a trading application. This requires some familiarisation with the exchange interfaces. In essence, there are two sides on any exchange: people who want to sell, and people who want to buy. Everybody can sell or buy at the price they want, but obviously buyers want to buy at the cheapest price and sellers want to make the biggest profit, which means that eventually a middle point will be reached where the transactions take place. It’s common for people to cancel their sell or buy orders and put in place new ones by 0.00001 increments just to get the « top » place on the buy or sell list, i.e. sell at the « lowest price » or buy at the « highest price » in order to have their order fulfilled. Once you buy (or sell) the balances get adjusted accordingly
Now, imagine that you decide to buy the stocks of those five companies with your $1,000. To do this, you will incur $50 in trading costs—assuming the fee is $10—which is equivalent to 5% of your $1,000. If you were to fully invest the $1,000, your account would be reduced to $950 after trading costs. This represents a 5% loss before your investments even have a chance to earn.
Fees beyond trade commissions include inactivity fees (common with active trading brokers such as Interactive Brokers, Lightspeed, and TradeStation) and IRA fees for having a retirement account. While most brokers do not charge predatory fees, it’s still important to do your due diligence. Just like a bank account, stock brokers also make a portion of their profits off miscellaneous fees.

Competition has spurred many brokerages to slash commission fees, which can add up quickly if you buy and sell stocks, mutual funds or ETFs frequently. Robinhood is not the only company that does not charge commission fees. Starting in October, Interactive Brokers is providing an unlimited number of commission-free trades on U.S. exchange-traded stocks and ETFs along with no account minimums or inactivity fees.


It pays to shop around some before deciding on where you want to open an account, and to check out our broker reviews. We list minimum deposits at the top of each review. Some firms do not require minimum deposits. Others may often lower costs, like trading fees and account management fees, if you have a balance above a certain threshold. Still, others may give a certain number of commission-free trades for opening an account.

Dollar-cost average: This sounds complicated, but it’s not. Dollar-cost averaging means investing a set amount of money at regular intervals, such as once per week or month. That set amount buys more shares when the stock price goes down and fewer shares when it rises, but overall, it evens out the average price you pay. Some online brokerage firms let investors set up an automated investing schedule.
×