You can profit from owning stocks by an increase in prices or quarterly dividend payments. Due to compound interest—which allows your interest to begin earning interest—investments accumulate over time and can yield a solid return. For example, if you make an initial $1,000 investment and add $100 monthly for 20 years, you'd end up with $74,457.50, even though you only contributed $25,000.

It’s all fun and games until the taxman passes. There is no clear legislation on taxes and it varies on per case and per country basis. My personal recommendation is to declare the money you cash out on your tax form. This would normally be taxed as « financial income money », just like if you sold shares or cashed out money from the income of your own company (like when you get paid dividends). Example: 15% financial income tax. You cash out 10000 EUR, you get taxed 15% on this.

Benjamin Graham, who is known as the father of value investing, has preached that the real money in investing will have to be made—as most of it has been in the past—not out of buying and selling, but out of owning and holding securities, receiving interest and dividends, and benefiting from their long-term increase in value. This practice has created millionaires.
Investopedia requires writers to use primary sources to support their work. These include white papers, government data, original reporting, and interviews with industry experts. We also reference original research from other reputable publishers where appropriate. You can learn more about the standards we follow in producing accurate, unbiased content in our editorial policy.
Benjamin Graham, who is known as the father of value investing, has preached that the real money in investing will have to be made—as most of it has been in the past—not out of buying and selling, but out of owning and holding securities, receiving interest and dividends, and benefiting from their long-term increase in value. This practice has created millionaires.
When thinking about the mindset of investors, The Great Crash 1929 by J.K.Galbraith (reviewed here) should also be required reading. Typically, any sustained fall in prices - known as a bear market - is very destructive to wealth. However, as Galbraith explains wonderfully, each bear market is unique and is a reflection of the bull market that came before it. The book explains a great deal about the feedback loops that can exist when prices rise and fall as more people are either sucked into or forced out of holdings. It is the reference work about a very important slice of Wall Street history.
Buy “the basket”: Can’t decide which of the companies in a particular industry will be the long-term winner? Buy ’em all! Buying a basket of stocks takes the pressure off picking “the one.” Having a stake in all the players that pass muster in your analysis means you won’t miss out if one takes off, and you can use gains from that winner to offset any losses. This strategy will also help you identify which company is “the one” so you can double down on your position if desired.
×