Before you start buying cryptocurrency, you must understand some concepts about investing. Remember, cryptocurrency markets are not regulated, so investor sentiment is aggravated by rumours, people spreading false information, « pump and dump » actions, « sell walls », FOMO (fear of missing out) and all sorts of manipulations including insider trading. Knowing these will hopefully help you rationalise your actions.

Fees beyond trade commissions include inactivity fees (common with active trading brokers such as Interactive Brokers, Lightspeed, and TradeStation) and IRA fees for having a retirement account. While most brokers do not charge predatory fees, it’s still important to do your due diligence. Just like a bank account, stock brokers also make a portion of their profits off miscellaneous fees.

Crypto-only exchanges do not handle any fiat currency, they don’t work at all with « real world money ». They will however allow you to trade a very large amount of cryptocurrencies. They have « markets », where you can exchange mainstream cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin (BTC), Ethereum (ETH) or Litecoin (LTC) for other less known cryptocurrencies. They will offer similar services as advanced exchanges but you will not be able to cash out. You would have to convert the cryptocurrencies you own to a more common one (BTC, ETH or LTC for example), send it to one of the fiat to cryptocurrency exchanges, and then transfer it to your account. Alternatively, you could also just decide to pay for goods and services in cryptocurrency. Or you could also withdraw the money via Bitcoin ATMs (where you send Bitcoin to an address and get cash, just like you would on a regular ATM).

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A local financial regulator or competent monetary authority or institute is assigned the task of regulating the stock market of a country. The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is the regulatory body charged with overseeing the U.S. stock markets. The SEC is a federal agency that works independently of the government and political pressure. The mission of the SEC is stated as: "to protect investors, maintain fair, orderly, and efficient markets, and facilitate capital formation."
Investment ideas can come from many places. If you want guidance from professional research services, you can turn to companies like Standard & Poor's, ValueLine, Morningstar, and other online resources. If the thought of spending your time browsing investment websites doesn't sound appealing, just take a look at your surroundings and see what people are interested in and buying.
Buy in thirds: Like dollar-cost averaging, “buying in thirds” helps you avoid the morale-crushing experience of bumpy results right out of the gate. Divide the amount you want to invest by three and then, as the name implies, pick three separate points to buy shares. These can be at regular intervals (e.g., monthly or quarterly) or based on performance or company events. For example, you might buy shares before a product is released and put the next third of your money into play if it’s a hit — or divert the remaining money elsewhere if it’s not.
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