Following the first-time share issuance IPO exercise called the listing process, the stock exchange also serves as the trading platform that facilitates regular buying and selling of the listed shares. This constitutes the secondary market. The stock exchange earns a fee for every trade that occurs on its platform during the secondary market activity.
Warning: Only invest in cryptocurrency what you can afford to lose! Be prepared to lose everything. Expect high fluctuations. Do not put in there money that is vital for you whether it is paying for rent, utilities, loans, mortgages or necessary goods (food & medicines). See this as spending money on collaterals or nice to have: restaurant, books, travelling, cinema etc.
The exchange also earns from selling market data generated on its platform - like real-time data, historical data, summary data, and reference data – which is vital for equity research and other uses. Many exchanges will also sell technology products, like a trading terminal and dedicated network connection to the exchange, to the interested parties for a suitable fee.
Altcoins are tied to the Bitcoin markets, if Bitcoin takes a hit there’s a high probability that altcoins will also suffer, so you’re looking at that moment to jump in: when others are panic selling, you should be investing. Also, there is a sort of tidal lock between altcoins and Bitcoin. Never take a green market (prices going up) for your preferred project finally breaking through. It could just be that the rise of Bitcoin price brings everything up organically, so you may be advise to check whether your project’s value in Bitcoin (not in US dollars or any other fiat currency) has changed or if it has stayed more or less the same. This is usually visible on cryptocurrency only exchanges where Bitcoin is often the de-facto main exchange currency.
Warning: Only invest in cryptocurrency what you can afford to lose! Be prepared to lose everything. Expect high fluctuations. Do not put in there money that is vital for you whether it is paying for rent, utilities, loans, mortgages or necessary goods (food & medicines). See this as spending money on collaterals or nice to have: restaurant, books, travelling, cinema etc.
Pump and dump: this characterises a movement where a group of people with influence will either spread rumours, share hypothetical information or shill (shameless promotion) about a given cryptocurrency project. Their followers will start to buy massively the related cryptocurrency, initiating a « pump » movement, i.e. price starts going up very high and fast. At the same time, the people who spread those rumours will leverage the high increase to do a « dump » movement, i.e. sell the same cryptocurrency (that they had bought at very low prices) at the newly reached high price. The result: the group that initiated the pump will make a large profit, while the people who jumped on the pump train (those who bought in because of FOMO, fear of missing out) will have bought at a high price and are now with an asset that is worth only a fraction of the purchase price
The stock market is made up of exchanges, like the New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq. Stocks are listed on a specific exchange, which brings buyers and sellers together and acts as a market for the shares of those stocks. The exchange tracks the supply and demand — and directly related, the price — of each stock. (Need to back up a bit? Read our explainer about stocks.)
What would make me sell: Sometimes there are good reasons to split up. For this part of your journal, compose an investing prenup that spells out what would drive you to sell the stock. We’re not talking about stock price movement, especially not short term, but fundamental changes to the business that affect its ability to grow over the long term. Some examples: The company loses a major customer, the CEO’s successor starts taking the business in a different direction, a major viable competitor emerges, or your investing thesis doesn’t pan out after a reasonable period of time.
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